Organic Farming Good Food For All

Organic Farming Good Food For All
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Organic Farming Good Food For All
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Organic Farming Good Food For All
Organic farming

Organic farming is another agricultural system that originated early in the 20th century in response to quickly changing farming techniques. Organic farming has been developed by several organic farming associations now. It depends on fertilizers of natural source like compost manure, green manure, and bone meal and puts emphasis on techniques like crop rotation and companion planting. Biological pest management, mixed cropping as well as the boosting of insect predators are all encouraged. Generally, organic standards are made to permit the utilization of naturally occurring compounds while banning or limiting synthetic materials. For example, naturally occurring pesticides like pyrethrin and rotenone are allowed, while artificial pesticides and fertilizers are usually prohibited. Synthetic substances which are permitted include, as an instance, aluminum sulfate, elemental sulfur and Ivermectin. Reasons for advocation of organic farming include benefits in sustainability, openness, self-sufficiency, autonomy/independence, wellness, food safety, and food security.

Reduced Exposure to Pesticides, Chemicals.
The Organic Trade Association notes if each farmer from the U.S. converted to organic production, we can remove 500 million pounds of harmful and persistent pesticides from going into the environment yearly. Pesticide and chemical usage contributes to several negative environmental dilemmas: 1.Pesticides permit disease immunity to accumulate in crops, weeds, plant-eating-insects, parasites, and bacteria. 2.Compounds and chemicals sprayed plants contaminate the soil, water source, and atmosphere. Occasionally these dangerous pesticides stay about for decades (possibly longer). 3.Artificial compounds also dissuade smart farming techniques like cover crops and crop rotation, which in turn, can cause other dangerous environmental issues like erosion.
Organic Farming Builds Healthy Soil.
To develop wholesome food, you have to begin with healthy soil. Should you treat the dirt with dangerous pesticides and chemicals, you might wind up with dirt which can't flourish by itself. Natural farming practices are much superior than compound soil administration. A sizable nine-year research by USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS), reveals that natural farming builds up organic soil issue better than traditional no-till farming. Based on Dr. Elaine Ingham, only 1 teaspoon of compost-rich organic dirt could host as many as 600 million to 1 billion beneficial germs from 15,000 species. Ingham notes on the reverse side, 1 teaspoon of soil treated with compounds may carry as much as 100 beneficial bacteria.
Combatting Erosion
Does organic farming build wholesome soil, but it also helps fight severe land and soil problems, like erosion. A significant research comparing adjacent natural and chemically treated wheat fields revealed that the organic area featured eight inches of topsoil compared to treated area and had only twenty the erosion reduction. In case you are not worried about erosion: you ought to be. Erosion problems are really severe, affecting the property, food distribution, and people. But, organic farming techniques do help discourage erosion from happening.
Assessing the Effects of Global Warming
Rodale Institute Farming Systems Trial is America's longest running, side-by-side contrast of traditional and organic farming. The trial, running since 1981, has demonstrated a wholesome organic agriculture system may actually reduce carbon dioxide and also help slow climate change. Actually, the Rodale study shows that: "If just 10,000 moderate sized farms in the U.S. converted into organic production, they'd save as much carbon from the soil it would be equal to carrying 1,174,400 automobiles off the street, or reducing automobile miles driven by 14.62 billion miles.
Organic Farming Supports Water Conservation and Water Health
Dwindling water supplies and inadequate water wellbeing are extremely real threats. When our water source is in danger, individuals and the world wind up suffering. American Rivers notes a significant water pollution threat to U.S ponds is runoff from non-organic farms, for example damaging pesticides, toxic fertilizers, and animal waste. Organic farming helps to keep our water supplies fresh by quitting that contaminated runoff. Organic farming also will help conserve water. Organic farmers, generally speaking, often devote some time amending soil properly and using mulch - both of which help preserve water. Cotton, an in-demand harvest, requires a great deal of irrigation and surplus water once grown conventionally. But, organic cotton farming requires less irrigation and so conserves water.
Discouraging Algal Blooms
Algal blooms (HABs) lead to adverse consequences on the health of individuals and marine creatures and organisms. Algal blooms also negatively impact tourism, diversion and so, regional and local markets. While there's more than 1 reason for algal blooms, a main human-based source of algae blooms is runoff in the petroleum-based fertilizers frequently utilized in traditional farming.
Supporting Animal Health and Welfare
Insects, fish, birds and all kinds of other creatures experience difficulties when individuals swoop in and destroy their habitat. Organic farming helps conserve more natural habitat regions but also promotes birds and other all-natural predators to live happily on farmland, which helps in pest control. Also, animals who reside on organic farms are vulnerable to wash, chemical-free grazing which can help keep them obviously healthy and immune to disease. As a benefit for organic farmers, healthy and happy natural animals are productive organic animals.​
Organic Farming Encourages Biodiversity
Insects, fish, birds and all kinds of other creatures experience difficulties when individuals swoop in and destroy their habitat. Organic farming helps conserve more natural habitat regions but also promotes birds and other all-natural predators to live happily on farmland, which helps in pest control. Also, animals who reside on organic farms are vulnerable to wash, chemical-free grazing which can help keep them obviously healthy and immune to disease. As a benefit for organic farmers, healthy and happy natural animals are productive organic animals.​
  The Organic Center recently collaborated on a proposal that was selected for a full symposium session at the Entomological Society of America Conference in St. Louis, MO November 17-20, 2019. The session, “Finding Common Ground: Non-chemical Pest-Management to Protect Organic and Conventional Crops” will bring an organic component to a well-attended scientific conference that does not normally focus... Read More ›

A new and deadly drug-resistant yeast, Candida auris, has been identified in 13 U.S. states and across the globe, according to the Centers for Disease Control. A recent New York Times article exposed the spread of this fungus across hospitals throughout the world, and highlighted the yeast’s potential to cause death for people with compromised... Read More ›

As part of the International Society of Organic Agriculture Research (ISOFAR) board, the Organic Center’s Director of Science Programs has joined the Organic World Congress (OWC) Science Board for the 2020 event, taking place September 21-27 in Rennes, France. The first call for proposals for the science track of the 2020 OWC has been released,... Read More ›

  An article recently published in the Journal of Agronomy Research assessed a wide range of organic mulch and fertilizers on the production of shallots in nutrient-poor and water-limited soils. The study found the combination of rice straw and composted cow manure achieved the best results with improved soil water content and increased shallot yield,... Read More ›

  A recent study, published in the journal of Ecology and Evolution, found that farmers can suppress weeds using less tillage when they combine cover crops and compost. Weeds are a major issue, particularly for organic agriculture that does not heavily apply herbicides. Instead, weeds can be controlled with deep tilling of the soil. However, as the... Read More ›

Cotton is one of the most widely grown crops in the world, and conventional cotton is one of the most chemically intensive crops with serious consequences for both the environment and farm workers. Furthermore, post-harvest treatment of cotton and fabric production practices can further contribute to environmental degradation. Organic cotton and textile production likely provides... Read More ›

  A recent article published in the Journal of Applied Ecology shows that contrary to popular perception, increased biodiversity on the farm can actually reduce risks of food-borne pathogens, and organic farming is the ticket to increasing the right kinds of insects and bacteria to suppress those pathogens. While it has been shown in countless... Read More ›

Hash browns are supposed to be easy to make from scratch, but despite soaking, draining and squeezing grated potatoes to get rid of their starch, hash browns can still come out stodgy and sticky unless you use a gallon of oil to fry them. This is the one instance where making hash browns from scratch... Read More ›

  Choosing organic when you’re shopping for beef at the supermarket may be a good way to boost the nutrition in your meals, according to a recent study published in the Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture. The study found more antioxidants in organic beef, with 34% more Q10, 72% more taurine, and 53% more... Read More ›

Annual event celebrates science-based work of The Center to advance organic Almost 500 organic visionaries, activists and businesses from around the country gathered on March 6 for The Organic Center’s 16th annual Benefit Dinner in Anaheim and raised a record $485,000 to further the important work of the non-profit research and education organization. “This year’s... Read More ›

  A recently published study in Nutrition Journal shows that people with future-oriented personalities are more likely to consume organic food. In the study conducted in France, over 27,000 participants responded to a questionnaire that quantified how much the respondents considered the future versus immediate consequences of their actions, and paired that with the proportion... Read More ›

Evaluating and Advancing Knowledge Transfer in Organic   This year’s Confluences Conference will take place in tandem with the Natural Foods Expo East on September 10th 2019, in Baltimore.   The Organic Confluences Summit brings together farmers, scientists, extension agents, industry members and key policy influencers to address large-scale challenges that the organic sector is facing. This... Read More ›

  A recent study published in the journal Ecological Economics found that organic agriculture can improve rural development and increase the livelihoods of farmers in China. Key findings from household surveys showed that organic farmers, and particularly mid-sized farmers, were able to earn more money as a result of higher premiums and fewer input costs.... Read More ›

  In addition to supporting the work of The Organic Center while enjoying a scrumptious all-organic dinner, attendees at the research organization’s annual benefit dinner March 6 in Anaheim will have the opportunity to receive some amazing prizes. Roundtrip airfare to Australia and an organic farm tour from Australian Organic Meats A PUBLIC bike, custom... Read More ›

Healthy soils can also play a key role in combating climate change because they maintain carbon stores for long periods of time. With proper management agriculture can actually increase the soil carbon pool, drawing carbon out of the atmosphere and storing it in the soil thus contributing directly to climate change mitigation. Understanding practices that... Read More ›

Environmental health researcher to receive Award of Excellence at Benefit Dinner The Organic Center will recognize environmental health scientist Dr. Asa Bradman with its Award of Excellence at the organization’s annual benefit dinner March 6 in Anaheim, California. Dr. Bradman, who co-founded the Center for Environmental Research and Children’s Health (CERCH) at the University of... Read More ›

  A study recently published in the journal Mutation Research/Reviews in Mutation Research links glyphosate-based herbicides (GHB) like Roundup with higher rates of the cancer Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL). This formative paper combines a review of human studies with animal research that showed increased exposure to glyphosate increased NHL cancer in mice. The researchers also included a review of the mechanisms for how glyphosate causes cancer cell... Read More ›

The Science A study in Applied Biological Research compared nutritional values of organic versus conventional kale, and found the organic kale was nutritionally superior. In particular, organic kale contained more protein and vitamin C, so the next time you feel like eating your greens, grab organic for a more nutritious meal. This is a really fast... Read More ›

  A recent study in Agricultural Systems shows that on a per area basis, organic systems use less energy and emit fewer greenhouse gases than conventional systems when crop rotations are long and diversified. The study uses a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) to account for on-farm energy use and greenhouse gas emissions across all stages involved... Read More ›

Research released today from Environmental Research shows that switching from a conventional to an organic diet for less than a week reduces levels of pesticides in both children and adults. While previous studies on organic diet interventions have focused on organophosphate pesticides alone, this study tested for a broad range of pesticides including neonicotinoids. Researchers screened... Read More ›

Research released today from the journal Environmental Research adds to the growing body of literature showing that switching to an all organic diet reduces existing levels of pesticides detected in children and adults. While previous studies on organic diet intervention have focused on organophosphate pesticides, this study tested for a broad range of pesticides including neonicotinoids.... Read More ›

  A recent study published in the Proceedings series of Advances in Social Science, Education and Humanities Research revealed that, while many farmers in Indonesia want to transition to organic and know the regulations, more research and extension would help them actually implement organic management. In this study, researchers surveyed 70 rice farmers in Indonesia and... Read More ›

  A recent review published in Sustainable Earth concludes that organic food simultaneously improves public and environmental health by drawing attention to the importance of a more plant-based, unrefined, and chemical-free diet. The authors found that people who tend to eat certified organic food also tend to eat foods that are considered healthier for the body... Read More ›

This recipe is adapted from Jamie Oliver’s and is really easy to make if you have a large food processor. It’s also a great way to get kids to eat more squash! It is especially important to buy organic butternut because you leave the skin on for this recipe. The Science According to a study... Read More ›

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