Organic Farming Good Food For All

Organic Farming Good Food For All
Home delivery
Organic Farming Good Food For All
Organic grocery
Organic Farming Good Food For All
Organic farming

Organic farming is another agricultural system that originated early in the 20th century in response to quickly changing farming techniques. Organic farming has been developed by several organic farming associations now. It depends on fertilizers of natural source like compost manure, green manure, and bone meal and puts emphasis on techniques like crop rotation and companion planting. Biological pest management, mixed cropping as well as the boosting of insect predators are all encouraged. Generally, organic standards are made to permit the utilization of naturally occurring compounds while banning or limiting synthetic materials. For example, naturally occurring pesticides like pyrethrin and rotenone are allowed, while artificial pesticides and fertilizers are usually prohibited. Synthetic substances which are permitted include, as an instance, aluminum sulfate, elemental sulfur and Ivermectin. Reasons for advocation of organic farming include benefits in sustainability, openness, self-sufficiency, autonomy/independence, wellness, food safety, and food security.

Reduced Exposure to Pesticides, Chemicals.
The Organic Trade Association notes if each farmer from the U.S. converted to organic production, we can remove 500 million pounds of harmful and persistent pesticides from going into the environment yearly. Pesticide and chemical usage contributes to several negative environmental dilemmas: 1.Pesticides permit disease immunity to accumulate in crops, weeds, plant-eating-insects, parasites, and bacteria. 2.Compounds and chemicals sprayed plants contaminate the soil, water source, and atmosphere. Occasionally these dangerous pesticides stay about for decades (possibly longer). 3.Artificial compounds also dissuade smart farming techniques like cover crops and crop rotation, which in turn, can cause other dangerous environmental issues like erosion.
Organic Farming Builds Healthy Soil.
To develop wholesome food, you have to begin with healthy soil. Should you treat the dirt with dangerous pesticides and chemicals, you might wind up with dirt which can't flourish by itself. Natural farming practices are much superior than compound soil administration. A sizable nine-year research by USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS), reveals that natural farming builds up organic soil issue better than traditional no-till farming. Based on Dr. Elaine Ingham, only 1 teaspoon of compost-rich organic dirt could host as many as 600 million to 1 billion beneficial germs from 15,000 species. Ingham notes on the reverse side, 1 teaspoon of soil treated with compounds may carry as much as 100 beneficial bacteria.
Combatting Erosion
Does organic farming build wholesome soil, but it also helps fight severe land and soil problems, like erosion. A significant research comparing adjacent natural and chemically treated wheat fields revealed that the organic area featured eight inches of topsoil compared to treated area and had only twenty the erosion reduction. In case you are not worried about erosion: you ought to be. Erosion problems are really severe, affecting the property, food distribution, and people. But, organic farming techniques do help discourage erosion from happening.
Assessing the Effects of Global Warming
Rodale Institute Farming Systems Trial is America's longest running, side-by-side contrast of traditional and organic farming. The trial, running since 1981, has demonstrated a wholesome organic agriculture system may actually reduce carbon dioxide and also help slow climate change. Actually, the Rodale study shows that: "If just 10,000 moderate sized farms in the U.S. converted into organic production, they'd save as much carbon from the soil it would be equal to carrying 1,174,400 automobiles off the street, or reducing automobile miles driven by 14.62 billion miles.
Organic Farming Supports Water Conservation and Water Health
Dwindling water supplies and inadequate water wellbeing are extremely real threats. When our water source is in danger, individuals and the world wind up suffering. American Rivers notes a significant water pollution threat to U.S ponds is runoff from non-organic farms, for example damaging pesticides, toxic fertilizers, and animal waste. Organic farming helps to keep our water supplies fresh by quitting that contaminated runoff. Organic farming also will help conserve water. Organic farmers, generally speaking, often devote some time amending soil properly and using mulch - both of which help preserve water. Cotton, an in-demand harvest, requires a great deal of irrigation and surplus water once grown conventionally. But, organic cotton farming requires less irrigation and so conserves water.
Discouraging Algal Blooms
Algal blooms (HABs) lead to adverse consequences on the health of individuals and marine creatures and organisms. Algal blooms also negatively impact tourism, diversion and so, regional and local markets. While there's more than 1 reason for algal blooms, a main human-based source of algae blooms is runoff in the petroleum-based fertilizers frequently utilized in traditional farming.
Supporting Animal Health and Welfare
Insects, fish, birds and all kinds of other creatures experience difficulties when individuals swoop in and destroy their habitat. Organic farming helps conserve more natural habitat regions but also promotes birds and other all-natural predators to live happily on farmland, which helps in pest control. Also, animals who reside on organic farms are vulnerable to wash, chemical-free grazing which can help keep them obviously healthy and immune to disease. As a benefit for organic farmers, healthy and happy natural animals are productive organic animals.​
Organic Farming Encourages Biodiversity
Insects, fish, birds and all kinds of other creatures experience difficulties when individuals swoop in and destroy their habitat. Organic farming helps conserve more natural habitat regions but also promotes birds and other all-natural predators to live happily on farmland, which helps in pest control. Also, animals who reside on organic farms are vulnerable to wash, chemical-free grazing which can help keep them obviously healthy and immune to disease. As a benefit for organic farmers, healthy and happy natural animals are productive organic animals.​
  A recent study in the journal Insects shows that planting floral resources for natural enemies and in combination with a trap crop that draws pests away from the cash crop is an effective strategy to control pests. Controlling crop pests naturally and without sprays can be challenging, especially against very aggressive pests like the... Read More ›

The Organic Center and FFAR to take stage prior to Expo East in September Today’s food and agriculture system faces serious challenges – how to feed an ever-growing population in a sustainable way, how to manage increasingly scarce water resources, how to improve human health and perhaps the biggest challenge of all: how to fight... Read More ›

Milk’s role as a potential contributor to a healthy diet is supported by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Heart Association. The U.S. dietary guidelines for Americans is 2 to 3 cups of milk or its equivalent per day. Equivalents can be found in all dairy products including yogurt and cheese.  And Americans... Read More ›

This month’s recipe combines two intriguing scientific studies: one on peaches and one on tea. These make the perfect combination for a refreshing drink on a hot August night. Recent science says that organic peaches are tastier, and organic tea production supports a healthier environment. The Science A study published in the journal Organic Agriculture... Read More ›

  Organic farming helps bolster important beneficial soil fungi, leading to healthier plants. These fungi improve nutrient uptake and soil health, and can help ward off diseases. While synthetic chemicals used in conventional farming reduce the amount and diversity of these microbes, a new study published in Nature: Scientific Reports shows that organic farming increases... Read More ›

  Organic certification requires farmers to support important biodiversity such as birds and bees. While a lot of research has shown that more plant diversity both on and off the farm can increase wildlife, not all biodiversity is welcomed. Some wildlife can cause problems as pests, and this includes some types of birds. Birds can... Read More ›

  A recent study in Journal Canadian Food Studies Special Issue: Food Procurement shows that large institution kitchens may be key players in reshaping the supply chain to get more sustainable food onto more plates. Food enters the supply chain in many ways whether it is sold directly to consumers or to wholesale buyers who then... Read More ›

  Biological soil amendments like compost are essential for organic farmers, and in some places, organic fertilizer production can be a limiting factor for organic farmers. A recent study published in the International Conference Proceedings of Uva Wellassa University, Sri Lanka  found that the biggest constraints to producing organic fertilizer were the amounts of time... Read More ›

Who knew you could grill peaches? This is a fun and easy dessert to add to your backyard BBQ. The Science Stone fruits such as peaches and nectarines are an important fruit because not only are they delicious, they are rich in vitamin C and antioxidants. One study in the journal Foods tried to extent the... Read More ›

  It is well known that organic farming practices increase important and beneficial biodiversity. A recent study published in the journal Biota Neotropica confirms this for a tropical cropping system: coffee. Both above and below ground insect populations were compared in conventional versus organic farms in Brazil, the second-largest coffee producing country in the world.... Read More ›

There has been some confusion about the methods of the Emory Study showing that organic tests clean for antibiotics and pesticides, and has 20 times lower levels of growth hormones than conventional milk. There have also been some erroneous criticisms of the methodology, which are rooted in a lack of knowledge about testing for toxicants. ... Read More ›

  Milk is an important contributor to a healthy the human diet. It provides important protein, fat, calcium and vitamin D. Equivalents can be found in all dairy products including yogurt and cheese. But not all milk is created equal. A large body of research has shown for nearly 15 years that organic milk has... Read More ›

  The question of whether organic farming can feed the world has fueled many studies that calculate ratios of conventional to organic yield to measure how organic production compares to the conventional benchmark. Authors of a recent study published in the journal Agronomy suggest that these yield gap calculations focus on the wrong question. Asking... Read More ›

  A cost/return analysis published in Agronomy Journal compared production costs, yield and net returns for conventional versus organic crop rotations. The study revealed that the longest, most diversified organic crop rotation was the most financially secure cropping system, and lower yields for organic crops were offset by higher premiums. Five cropping systems were measured:... Read More ›

  A recent study in Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems found that organic farms provide greater employment opportunities with more job stability when compared to county averages. Using USDA Agricultural Census data from counties in Washington State and California, the study compared the number of people hired per acre and the number of days the... Read More ›

For some reason, apricots are one of those fruits that come and go in the blink of an eye. They come on fast and furious, and you have a very short window of time to deal with an overabundant bounty. Jam is a great way to use up a surplus of fruit. In this case,... Read More ›

  Organic farmers must employ integrated management strategies to control pests in an environmentally friendly way. New research finds that these organic strategies can also help large-scale, conventional farmers reduce their dependence on synthetic inputs, by harnessing natural ecosystem functions through ecological intensification. Incorporating “agroforestry systems” by integrating trees and shrubs with other crops or... Read More ›

Apple production in North America and Europe is largely threatened by two insect pests: rosy apple aphids and codling moths. In conventional apple production, heavy inputs of insecticides are required to control these pests, but organic production cannot rely on the same chemical tools. A study published in the journal Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment found... Read More ›

  An article published in the most recent issue of the Organic Farmer magazine highlights a partnership between The Organic Center and UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine, and makes a call for more research on food safety risks of using raw manure on organic farms. The National Organic Program prohibits organic farmers from using synthetic fertilizers for nutrient... Read More ›

A study recently published in The BMJ Journal found that prenatal and infant exposure to pesticides consistently correlated with higher risk of autism in children. The strongest correlations were with exposure to chlorpyrifos, diazinon, and avermectin. Researchers analyzed exposure across three developmental stages–three months before pregnancy, during pregnancy, and the first year of child development–and... Read More ›

These pancakes look very impressive and are deceptively easy to make although you do need a blender. Dutch oven pancakes differ from regular pancakes in that you bake your batter and, in the process, they puff up huge like a soufflé. You end up with a sweet and salty, crispy yet chewy, airy pillow. This recipe... Read More ›

  A recent study published in the Journal PlosǀOne found that the most effective strategy to terminate cover crops in systems where herbicides are prohibited or reduced is a combination of roller crimping and flaming. Before crops can be planted to follow cover crops, the cover crop has to be terminated and turned back into... Read More ›

Citrus Greening is a devastating disease affecting citrus around the world. It has swept through the United States, wiping out over 60% of the citrus harvest in Florida alone. To date there has been no cure found for this disease, and most of the research on control measures have focused on conventional protocols. However, a... Read More ›

  The Organic Center recently collaborated on a proposal that was selected for a full symposium session at the Entomological Society of America Conference in St. Louis, MO November 17-20, 2019. The session, “Finding Common Ground: Non-chemical Pest-Management to Protect Organic and Conventional Crops” will bring an organic component to a well-attended scientific conference that does not normally focus... Read More ›

A new and deadly drug-resistant yeast, Candida auris, has been identified in 13 U.S. states and across the globe, according to the Centers for Disease Control. A recent New York Times article exposed the spread of this fungus across hospitals throughout the world, and highlighted the yeast’s potential to cause death for people with compromised... Read More ›

As part of the International Society of Organic Agriculture Research (ISOFAR) board, the Organic Center’s Director of Science Programs has joined the Organic World Congress (OWC) Science Board for the 2020 event, taking place September 21-27 in Rennes, France. The first call for proposals for the science track of the 2020 OWC has been released,... Read More ›

  An article recently published in the Journal of Agronomy Research assessed a wide range of organic mulch and fertilizers on the production of shallots in nutrient-poor and water-limited soils. The study found the combination of rice straw and composted cow manure achieved the best results with improved soil water content and increased shallot yield,... Read More ›

  A recent study, published in the journal of Ecology and Evolution, found that farmers can suppress weeds using less tillage when they combine cover crops and compost. Weeds are a major issue, particularly for organic agriculture that does not heavily apply herbicides. Instead, weeds can be controlled with deep tilling of the soil. However, as the... Read More ›

Cotton is one of the most widely grown crops in the world, and conventional cotton is one of the most chemically intensive crops with serious consequences for both the environment and farm workers. Furthermore, post-harvest treatment of cotton and fabric production practices can further contribute to environmental degradation. Organic cotton and textile production likely provides... Read More ›

  A recent article published in the Journal of Applied Ecology shows that contrary to popular perception, increased biodiversity on the farm can actually reduce risks of food-borne pathogens, and organic farming is the ticket to increasing the right kinds of insects and bacteria to suppress those pathogens. While it has been shown in countless... Read More ›

Hash browns are supposed to be easy to make from scratch, but despite soaking, draining and squeezing grated potatoes to get rid of their starch, hash browns can still come out stodgy and sticky unless you use a gallon of oil to fry them. This is the one instance where making hash browns from scratch... Read More ›

  Choosing organic when you’re shopping for beef at the supermarket may be a good way to boost the nutrition in your meals, according to a recent study published in the Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture. The study found more antioxidants in organic beef, with 34% more Q10, 72% more taurine, and 53% more... Read More ›

Annual event celebrates science-based work of The Center to advance organic Almost 500 organic visionaries, activists and businesses from around the country gathered on March 6 for The Organic Center’s 16th annual Benefit Dinner in Anaheim and raised a record $485,000 to further the important work of the non-profit research and education organization. “This year’s... Read More ›

  A recently published study in Nutrition Journal shows that people with future-oriented personalities are more likely to consume organic food. In the study conducted in France, over 27,000 participants responded to a questionnaire that quantified how much the respondents considered the future versus immediate consequences of their actions, and paired that with the proportion... Read More ›

Evaluating and Advancing Knowledge Transfer in Organic   This year’s Confluences Conference will take place in tandem with the Natural Foods Expo East on September 10th 2019, in Baltimore.   The Organic Confluences Summit brings together farmers, scientists, extension agents, industry members and key policy influencers to address large-scale challenges that the organic sector is facing. This... Read More ›

  A recent study published in the journal Ecological Economics found that organic agriculture can improve rural development and increase the livelihoods of farmers in China. Key findings from household surveys showed that organic farmers, and particularly mid-sized farmers, were able to earn more money as a result of higher premiums and fewer input costs.... Read More ›

  In addition to supporting the work of The Organic Center while enjoying a scrumptious all-organic dinner, attendees at the research organization’s annual benefit dinner March 6 in Anaheim will have the opportunity to receive some amazing prizes. Roundtrip airfare to Australia and an organic farm tour from Australian Organic Meats A PUBLIC bike, custom... Read More ›

Healthy soils can also play a key role in combating climate change because they maintain carbon stores for long periods of time. With proper management agriculture can actually increase the soil carbon pool, drawing carbon out of the atmosphere and storing it in the soil thus contributing directly to climate change mitigation. Understanding practices that... Read More ›

Environmental health researcher to receive Award of Excellence at Benefit Dinner The Organic Center will recognize environmental health scientist Dr. Asa Bradman with its Award of Excellence at the organization’s annual benefit dinner March 6 in Anaheim, California. Dr. Bradman, who co-founded the Center for Environmental Research and Children’s Health (CERCH) at the University of... Read More ›

  A study recently published in the journal Mutation Research/Reviews in Mutation Research links glyphosate-based herbicides (GHB) like Roundup with higher rates of the cancer Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL). This formative paper combines a review of human studies with animal research that showed increased exposure to glyphosate increased NHL cancer in mice. The researchers also included a review of the mechanisms for how glyphosate causes cancer cell... Read More ›

Kitchn | Inspiring cooks, nourishing homes

Inspiring cooks, nourishing homes

Fresh n' Lean

Meal Prep Delivery Service

Blue Sky Organic Farms

Family Run. Locally Grown. Organic Food