Organic Farming Good Food For All

Organic Farming Good Food For All
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Organic Farming Good Food For All
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Organic Farming Good Food For All
Organic farming

Organic farming is another agricultural system that originated early in the 20th century in response to quickly changing farming techniques. Organic farming has been developed by several organic farming associations now. It depends on fertilizers of natural source like compost manure, green manure, and bone meal and puts emphasis on techniques like crop rotation and companion planting. Biological pest management, mixed cropping as well as the boosting of insect predators are all encouraged. Generally, organic standards are made to permit the utilization of naturally occurring compounds while banning or limiting synthetic materials. For example, naturally occurring pesticides like pyrethrin and rotenone are allowed, while artificial pesticides and fertilizers are usually prohibited. Synthetic substances which are permitted include, as an instance, aluminum sulfate, elemental sulfur and Ivermectin. Reasons for advocation of organic farming include benefits in sustainability, openness, self-sufficiency, autonomy/independence, wellness, food safety, and food security.

Reduced Exposure to Pesticides, Chemicals.
The Organic Trade Association notes if each farmer from the U.S. converted to organic production, we can remove 500 million pounds of harmful and persistent pesticides from going into the environment yearly. Pesticide and chemical usage contributes to several negative environmental dilemmas: 1.Pesticides permit disease immunity to accumulate in crops, weeds, plant-eating-insects, parasites, and bacteria. 2.Compounds and chemicals sprayed plants contaminate the soil, water source, and atmosphere. Occasionally these dangerous pesticides stay about for decades (possibly longer). 3.Artificial compounds also dissuade smart farming techniques like cover crops and crop rotation, which in turn, can cause other dangerous environmental issues like erosion.
Organic Farming Builds Healthy Soil.
To develop wholesome food, you have to begin with healthy soil. Should you treat the dirt with dangerous pesticides and chemicals, you might wind up with dirt which can't flourish by itself. Natural farming practices are much superior than compound soil administration. A sizable nine-year research by USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS), reveals that natural farming builds up organic soil issue better than traditional no-till farming. Based on Dr. Elaine Ingham, only 1 teaspoon of compost-rich organic dirt could host as many as 600 million to 1 billion beneficial germs from 15,000 species. Ingham notes on the reverse side, 1 teaspoon of soil treated with compounds may carry as much as 100 beneficial bacteria.
Combatting Erosion
Does organic farming build wholesome soil, but it also helps fight severe land and soil problems, like erosion. A significant research comparing adjacent natural and chemically treated wheat fields revealed that the organic area featured eight inches of topsoil compared to treated area and had only twenty the erosion reduction. In case you are not worried about erosion: you ought to be. Erosion problems are really severe, affecting the property, food distribution, and people. But, organic farming techniques do help discourage erosion from happening.
Assessing the Effects of Global Warming
Rodale Institute Farming Systems Trial is America's longest running, side-by-side contrast of traditional and organic farming. The trial, running since 1981, has demonstrated a wholesome organic agriculture system may actually reduce carbon dioxide and also help slow climate change. Actually, the Rodale study shows that: "If just 10,000 moderate sized farms in the U.S. converted into organic production, they'd save as much carbon from the soil it would be equal to carrying 1,174,400 automobiles off the street, or reducing automobile miles driven by 14.62 billion miles.
Organic Farming Supports Water Conservation and Water Health
Dwindling water supplies and inadequate water wellbeing are extremely real threats. When our water source is in danger, individuals and the world wind up suffering. American Rivers notes a significant water pollution threat to U.S ponds is runoff from non-organic farms, for example damaging pesticides, toxic fertilizers, and animal waste. Organic farming helps to keep our water supplies fresh by quitting that contaminated runoff. Organic farming also will help conserve water. Organic farmers, generally speaking, often devote some time amending soil properly and using mulch - both of which help preserve water. Cotton, an in-demand harvest, requires a great deal of irrigation and surplus water once grown conventionally. But, organic cotton farming requires less irrigation and so conserves water.
Discouraging Algal Blooms
Algal blooms (HABs) lead to adverse consequences on the health of individuals and marine creatures and organisms. Algal blooms also negatively impact tourism, diversion and so, regional and local markets. While there's more than 1 reason for algal blooms, a main human-based source of algae blooms is runoff in the petroleum-based fertilizers frequently utilized in traditional farming.
Supporting Animal Health and Welfare
Insects, fish, birds and all kinds of other creatures experience difficulties when individuals swoop in and destroy their habitat. Organic farming helps conserve more natural habitat regions but also promotes birds and other all-natural predators to live happily on farmland, which helps in pest control. Also, animals who reside on organic farms are vulnerable to wash, chemical-free grazing which can help keep them obviously healthy and immune to disease. As a benefit for organic farmers, healthy and happy natural animals are productive organic animals.​
Organic Farming Encourages Biodiversity
Insects, fish, birds and all kinds of other creatures experience difficulties when individuals swoop in and destroy their habitat. Organic farming helps conserve more natural habitat regions but also promotes birds and other all-natural predators to live happily on farmland, which helps in pest control. Also, animals who reside on organic farms are vulnerable to wash, chemical-free grazing which can help keep them obviously healthy and immune to disease. As a benefit for organic farmers, healthy and happy natural animals are productive organic animals.​
A recent study in Frontiers In Sustainable Food Systems found that as many organic farmers rely on manure as a tool to manage soil fertility, they have a strong need for more research to develop feasible strategies to reduce food safety risks associated with their use. Organic practices, particularly the use of untreated manure and... Read More ›

  Insects can be really important and beneficial to crop production when they provide services such as pollination and help control other pest insects. A recent study published in Science Advances shows that crop yield improves when the abundance and diversity of insects increase. Using data from 89 studies conducted on 1,475 field sites across... Read More ›

  At a time when unemployment threatens rural economies around the world, farms with more crop diversity offer more jobs. A recent study in the journal Ecological Economics has shown that across the globe, crop-diverse farms provide more employment opportunities than specialized, monoculture farming systems. In addition to supporting more jobs, increased crop diversity was... Read More ›

Wild rice is a whole grain rich in phenolic compounds (i.e. antioxidants). This gluten-free, rice “stuffing” dish fits perfectly into any holiday or every day meal and can be enjoyed throughout all the colder months. You can change up the vegetables to suit the season and remember to buy organic rice! The Science The journal Foods recently... Read More ›

  Coffee is largely grown in regions where smallholder farmers face poverty, and climate change threatens devastation to their crops. A recent review published in the journal Environmental Science and Policy shows that minor adaptations to climate change may be feasible for small coffee farmers, but projected changes will be too great for farmers to... Read More ›

There have been several media articles covering a Nature Communications study, claiming that increased transition to organic in England and Wales would increase greenhouse gas release into the atmosphere.  Unfortunately, these articles are using the same tired fallacies that The Organic Center has debunked before – and we’re returning to do it again with this... Read More ›

  New research shows that there is good news when it comes to supporting the health of our environment—growing a diversity of crops can increase biodiversity, without taking a toll on crop yield. In fact, in stressful conditions that are becoming more frequent with climate change, yield increased in diversified cropping systems. The study published... Read More ›

This recipe is very simple, yet extremely flavorful. Because there are so few ingredients, it’s important to get the tastiest that you can find. Normally, roasted nuts are preferred because they pack more flavor, and you’re encouraged to try this salad with roasted nuts, too. However, the texture of the raw almonds matches that of... Read More ›

  A new study has been added to the list of growing research that shows our food security is threatened by climate change. Research published in the journal Pest Management Science found that wheat yield and quality are reduced by warmer temperatures associated with climate change. Rising temperatures shortened the growing season for wheat, but... Read More ›

Grants awarded to address organic processed meat curing and citrus greening disease Grants announced this past week from the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Organic Agriculture and Research and Extension Initiative (OREI) will make it possible for The Organic Center to help advance research on two vital issues affecting the organic industry. The first, a nearly... Read More ›

  Bananas are a victim to climate change, according to a new study published in the scientific journal Philosophical Transactions Royal Society B. This research found that rising temperatures and intensifying banana production over the past 60 years have significantly increased the risk of fungal diseases in banana production. Fungal diseases thrive in warm, wet... Read More ›

Pickling peppers in the summer when they’re ready lets you enjoy the their flavor and nutritional benefits year-round. Tacos and nachos provide an excellent venue to pile them onto your plate. The Science Chili peppers can provide a lot of vitamin C and antioxidants if you can take their heat! A PLOS ONE study showed... Read More ›

  A six-month diet interventional study recently published in the journal Environment International shows that eating mostly organic produce can significantly reduce exposure to neurotoxic pyrethroid pesticides. Human exposure to these agri-chemicals often occurs by ingesting produce contaminated with pesticide residues. Prenatal exposure to pyrethroids has been linked to behavior and developmental issues in children.... Read More ›

Partners with Furman University, Wild Farm Alliance, to produce valuable resource Organic farmers and certifiers seeking to plan and improve their practices to protect natural resources and foster biodiversity now have a scientific tool to do just that. The Biodiversity Guidance Calculator is the product of a collaboration undertaken by The Organic Center, Furman University... Read More ›

  Exposure to harsh pesticides like organophosphates is linked to symptoms of neurobehavioral issues in children. New research uses neuroimaging to show how the brain physically changes with pesticide exposure. The research published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America (PNAS) found that exposure to organophosphates (OPs) is... Read More ›

Organic farming uses manure and compost instead of synthetic fertilizer, and new research finds that this can help mitigate climate change. Published in the journal Global Change Biology, a recent study found that using compost is critical to long-term carbon storage in deep layers of the soil. Amending soil with organic inputs like cover crops... Read More ›

  A recent study in Frontiers in Microbiology shows that the microbial diversity on organic fruit may be able to keep disease-causing bacteria at bay. Researchers compared bacterial communities in organic versus conventional apples, and found that while organic and conventional apples have the same amount of bacteria on them, organic apples have more beneficial bacteria that offer... Read More ›

  A study recently published in the Journal of Applied Ecology found that organic agriculture can significantly increase the health of honeybee hives by providing continuous food sources when flowers are scarce in the landscape. Intensive and conventional farming are known to decrease important biodiversity such as pollinators and natural enemies to pests by removing... Read More ›

The fall harvest brings a bounty of tomatoes that can be hard to keep up with. If you have the room, one trick is to put whole tomatoes into freezer bags and store in the freezer, pulling them out as needed any time of the year. You can also store your homemade tomato sauce in... Read More ›

Read the Outcomes of the 2018 Organic Confluences Conference here! The Organic Confluences Conference: Evaluating and Advancing Knowledge Transfer in Organic Production (May 21- 22, 2018, Washington, D.C.) brought together extension professionals representatives of relevant non-profit organizations, scientific experts, organic and conventional producers policymakers, industry participants and other stakeholders to help assess the current state... Read More ›

  A recent study in the journal Scientia Horticulturae found that agroecological organic production outperformed larger-scale and more intensive organic and conventional production systems. As the demand for organic food increases, organic farming is faced with new challenges related with scaling up to provide a greater supply of organic food. This study quantified the environmental... Read More ›

September 10, 2019 Hilton, Baltimore, MD Strategic partnerships to build a scaffolding for prioritizing research projects to address the top needs of the organic community  For more a map of where the event will take place inside the Hilton, click here. 9:00-9:15am                  Welcome, Opening Remarks and Introductions 9:15-10:15am                 Organic Research Opportunities Researchers will set... Read More ›

  A recent study in the journal Biological Control surveyed beetle communities in conventional and organic farms, and found that only organic farms fostered the right beetle species that directly suppresses E. coli on farms. Foodborne pathogens such as E. coli can enter a cropping system through livestock and other wildlife feces. When flies that... Read More ›

A recent study published in the journal Global Ecology and Conservation found that farmers are more likely to purchase less expensive pesticides, and those that cost less also are the most harmful to the environment and to human health. Protecting crops against insect pests is essential for farmers to produce high-quality food. However, the popular... Read More ›

  A recent study in the journal Insects shows that planting floral resources for natural enemies and in combination with a trap crop that draws pests away from the cash crop is an effective strategy to control pests. Controlling crop pests naturally and without sprays can be challenging, especially against very aggressive pests like the... Read More ›

The Organic Center and FFAR to take stage prior to Expo East in September Today’s food and agriculture system faces serious challenges – how to feed an ever-growing population in a sustainable way, how to manage increasingly scarce water resources, how to improve human health and perhaps the biggest challenge of all: how to fight... Read More ›

Milk’s role as a potential contributor to a healthy diet is supported by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Heart Association. The U.S. dietary guidelines for Americans is 2 to 3 cups of milk or its equivalent per day. Equivalents can be found in all dairy products including yogurt and cheese.  And Americans... Read More ›

This month’s recipe combines two intriguing scientific studies: one on peaches and one on tea. These make the perfect combination for a refreshing drink on a hot August night. Recent science says that organic peaches are tastier, and organic tea production supports a healthier environment. The Science A study published in the journal Organic Agriculture... Read More ›

  Organic farming helps bolster important beneficial soil fungi, leading to healthier plants. These fungi improve nutrient uptake and soil health, and can help ward off diseases. While synthetic chemicals used in conventional farming reduce the amount and diversity of these microbes, a new study published in Nature: Scientific Reports shows that organic farming increases... Read More ›

  Organic certification requires farmers to support important biodiversity such as birds and bees. While a lot of research has shown that more plant diversity both on and off the farm can increase wildlife, not all biodiversity is welcomed. Some wildlife can cause problems as pests, and this includes some types of birds. Birds can... Read More ›

  A recent study in Journal Canadian Food Studies Special Issue: Food Procurement shows that large institution kitchens may be key players in reshaping the supply chain to get more sustainable food onto more plates. Food enters the supply chain in many ways whether it is sold directly to consumers or to wholesale buyers who then... Read More ›

  Biological soil amendments like compost are essential for organic farmers, and in some places, organic fertilizer production can be a limiting factor for organic farmers. A recent study published in the International Conference Proceedings of Uva Wellassa University, Sri Lanka  found that the biggest constraints to producing organic fertilizer were the amounts of time... Read More ›

Who knew you could grill peaches? This is a fun and easy dessert to add to your backyard BBQ. The Science Stone fruits such as peaches and nectarines are an important fruit because not only are they delicious, they are rich in vitamin C and antioxidants. One study in the journal Foods tried to extent the... Read More ›

  It is well known that organic farming practices increase important and beneficial biodiversity. A recent study published in the journal Biota Neotropica confirms this for a tropical cropping system: coffee. Both above and below ground insect populations were compared in conventional versus organic farms in Brazil, the second-largest coffee producing country in the world.... Read More ›

There has been some confusion about the methods of the Emory Study showing that organic tests clean for antibiotics and pesticides, and has 20 times lower levels of growth hormones than conventional milk. There have also been some erroneous criticisms of the methodology, which are rooted in a lack of knowledge about testing for toxicants. ... Read More ›

  Milk is an important contributor to a healthy the human diet. It provides important protein, fat, calcium and vitamin D. Equivalents can be found in all dairy products including yogurt and cheese. But not all milk is created equal. A large body of research has shown for nearly 15 years that organic milk has... Read More ›

  The question of whether organic farming can feed the world has fueled many studies that calculate ratios of conventional to organic yield to measure how organic production compares to the conventional benchmark. Authors of a recent study published in the journal Agronomy suggest that these yield gap calculations focus on the wrong question. Asking... Read More ›

  A cost/return analysis published in Agronomy Journal compared production costs, yield and net returns for conventional versus organic crop rotations. The study revealed that the longest, most diversified organic crop rotation was the most financially secure cropping system, and lower yields for organic crops were offset by higher premiums. Five cropping systems were measured:... Read More ›

  A recent study in Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems found that organic farms provide greater employment opportunities with more job stability when compared to county averages. Using USDA Agricultural Census data from counties in Washington State and California, the study compared the number of people hired per acre and the number of days the... Read More ›

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