Organic Farming Good Food For All

Organic Farming Good Food For All
Home delivery
Organic Farming Good Food For All
Organic grocery
Organic Farming Good Food For All
Organic farming

Organic farming is another agricultural system that originated early in the 20th century in response to quickly changing farming techniques. Organic farming has been developed by several organic farming associations now. It depends on fertilizers of natural source like compost manure, green manure, and bone meal and puts emphasis on techniques like crop rotation and companion planting. Biological pest management, mixed cropping as well as the boosting of insect predators are all encouraged. Generally, organic standards are made to permit the utilization of naturally occurring compounds while banning or limiting synthetic materials. For example, naturally occurring pesticides like pyrethrin and rotenone are allowed, while artificial pesticides and fertilizers are usually prohibited. Synthetic substances which are permitted include, as an instance, aluminum sulfate, elemental sulfur and Ivermectin. Reasons for advocation of organic farming include benefits in sustainability, openness, self-sufficiency, autonomy/independence, wellness, food safety, and food security.

Reduced Exposure to Pesticides, Chemicals.
The Organic Trade Association notes if each farmer from the U.S. converted to organic production, we can remove 500 million pounds of harmful and persistent pesticides from going into the environment yearly. Pesticide and chemical usage contributes to several negative environmental dilemmas: 1.Pesticides permit disease immunity to accumulate in crops, weeds, plant-eating-insects, parasites, and bacteria. 2.Compounds and chemicals sprayed plants contaminate the soil, water source, and atmosphere. Occasionally these dangerous pesticides stay about for decades (possibly longer). 3.Artificial compounds also dissuade smart farming techniques like cover crops and crop rotation, which in turn, can cause other dangerous environmental issues like erosion.
Organic Farming Builds Healthy Soil.
To develop wholesome food, you have to begin with healthy soil. Should you treat the dirt with dangerous pesticides and chemicals, you might wind up with dirt which can't flourish by itself. Natural farming practices are much superior than compound soil administration. A sizable nine-year research by USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS), reveals that natural farming builds up organic soil issue better than traditional no-till farming. Based on Dr. Elaine Ingham, only 1 teaspoon of compost-rich organic dirt could host as many as 600 million to 1 billion beneficial germs from 15,000 species. Ingham notes on the reverse side, 1 teaspoon of soil treated with compounds may carry as much as 100 beneficial bacteria.
Combatting Erosion
Does organic farming build wholesome soil, but it also helps fight severe land and soil problems, like erosion. A significant research comparing adjacent natural and chemically treated wheat fields revealed that the organic area featured eight inches of topsoil compared to treated area and had only twenty the erosion reduction. In case you are not worried about erosion: you ought to be. Erosion problems are really severe, affecting the property, food distribution, and people. But, organic farming techniques do help discourage erosion from happening.
Assessing the Effects of Global Warming
Rodale Institute Farming Systems Trial is America's longest running, side-by-side contrast of traditional and organic farming. The trial, running since 1981, has demonstrated a wholesome organic agriculture system may actually reduce carbon dioxide and also help slow climate change. Actually, the Rodale study shows that: "If just 10,000 moderate sized farms in the U.S. converted into organic production, they'd save as much carbon from the soil it would be equal to carrying 1,174,400 automobiles off the street, or reducing automobile miles driven by 14.62 billion miles.
Organic Farming Supports Water Conservation and Water Health
Dwindling water supplies and inadequate water wellbeing are extremely real threats. When our water source is in danger, individuals and the world wind up suffering. American Rivers notes a significant water pollution threat to U.S ponds is runoff from non-organic farms, for example damaging pesticides, toxic fertilizers, and animal waste. Organic farming helps to keep our water supplies fresh by quitting that contaminated runoff. Organic farming also will help conserve water. Organic farmers, generally speaking, often devote some time amending soil properly and using mulch - both of which help preserve water. Cotton, an in-demand harvest, requires a great deal of irrigation and surplus water once grown conventionally. But, organic cotton farming requires less irrigation and so conserves water.
Discouraging Algal Blooms
Algal blooms (HABs) lead to adverse consequences on the health of individuals and marine creatures and organisms. Algal blooms also negatively impact tourism, diversion and so, regional and local markets. While there's more than 1 reason for algal blooms, a main human-based source of algae blooms is runoff in the petroleum-based fertilizers frequently utilized in traditional farming.
Supporting Animal Health and Welfare
Insects, fish, birds and all kinds of other creatures experience difficulties when individuals swoop in and destroy their habitat. Organic farming helps conserve more natural habitat regions but also promotes birds and other all-natural predators to live happily on farmland, which helps in pest control. Also, animals who reside on organic farms are vulnerable to wash, chemical-free grazing which can help keep them obviously healthy and immune to disease. As a benefit for organic farmers, healthy and happy natural animals are productive organic animals.​
Organic Farming Encourages Biodiversity
Insects, fish, birds and all kinds of other creatures experience difficulties when individuals swoop in and destroy their habitat. Organic farming helps conserve more natural habitat regions but also promotes birds and other all-natural predators to live happily on farmland, which helps in pest control. Also, animals who reside on organic farms are vulnerable to wash, chemical-free grazing which can help keep them obviously healthy and immune to disease. As a benefit for organic farmers, healthy and happy natural animals are productive organic animals.​
On September 11th, The Organic Trade Association honored Israel Morales Sr. from JV Farms Organic with the Organic Farmer of the Year Award. Israel Morales Sr. is JV Farms Organic’s lead grower with over 40 years of farming experience. Israel has extensive experience not just in knowing what produce matches the type of soil but […]

On September 11thfriends and peers gathered at the Organic Trade Association’s awards dinner to celebrate Lynn Coody’s lifelong dream. On that evening, the OTA honored her with the Growing the Organic Community Award. Lynn has been a crucial voice for organic since the 1970s. She was instrumental in the passage of Oregon’s Organic Food Law […]

I’ve written quite a lot about the Climate Crisis because it should be top of mind for all of us. NOAAjust confirmed that this summer matched 2016 as the hottest on record. Ice coverage in the Arctic shrunk to the second smallest ever recorded. The Organic Center’s Confluences Conference, last week at Expo East, drove […]

As I write this, Dorian, whose winds are the strongest ever recorded so far north in the Atlantic Ocean, is laying waste to the Bahamas. It threatens to wreak havoc along the Eastern States. The Amazon rainforest continues to burn, threatening the very survival of many species – including ourselves. July was the hottest month on […]

We’ve all felt it; the dog days are expanding their territory, lasting longer and showing their teeth more often. According to NOAA, eight of the ten warmest years on record have occurred within the past decade. 2016 was the warmest year in the history of instrumental observation, and 2017 was the warmest year without an […]

I begin with a confession. This summer is the second time I have tended a garden since I was a child alongside my grandfather. For most of my adult life, I was too busy trading organic faire, building businesses—doing what I could to heal the planet through food and agriculture. I am enjoying this garden […]

This summit is the only place that the fresh organic produce community can come together to discuss shared opportunities and vet challenges. With over 240 retailers and 148 grower-shipper processors in attendance, there was a lot to catch up on. This sense of community is the real reason OPS is my "go-to" show for organic produce – and it always will be.  

The Artisans of the Reggio Emilia region have been making Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese for about nine centuriesThe cheese is made in the same way, in the same places, with the same traditional rituals and methods.

The Italians value their rich culinary heritage and the long history of traditional Italian foods. In order to protect this heritage, they have a system of verification that identifies traditional products. The aim is to to ensure that all their time-honored victuals are preserved and held to a strict standard for quality, excellence and originality.

How a simple Focaccia showed me the importance of the cultural heritage of place and food. By protecting the reputation of regional foods, Italians promote rural agriculture and help producers maintain premium prices. This, in turn, keeps their culinary heritage intact.

I travel to a place in Italy that rests for the most part in the Mediterranean culinary corner. Wine and fine aged vinegars run through it. I go forth to venture if the fat and the oil and the sun at that latitude are worthy of the claims being made.

There is a culinary line that dissects the midriff of the Europe continent. It straddles the line of abundant pastas and pestos, parmesan and prosciutto with cold ham, eggs and Riesling. I go forth to venture if the fat and the oil and the sun at that latitude are worthy of the claims being made.

The last 10 years has us witnessing an explosion of new approaches and modified materials that strive to bioengineer Nature herself.

As a follow up to my interview with Chuck Benbrook, I was astounded to see the verdict come through on the case of Alva and Alberta Pilliod. The jury awarded them an astonishing $2 billion in damages for their exposure to the herbicide glyphosate and their subsequent fight with Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Chuck testified in the case […]

"It’s important for the organic community to do everything realistically possible to reassure consumers that organic food and farming delivers on the promised reduction of pesticide exposure and risks."

It’s that time of year again – the sap is flowing – flowers are budding, and cover crops are getting turned into rich organic loam. It’s spring – the time when the National Organic Standards Board (NOSB) convenes for its biannual public meeting. These meetings are important to everyone involved in the organic industry, and […]

After the demise of the USDA mandatory research and promotion check-off attempt, the Organic Trade Association (OTA) and Organic Voices (OV) decided to take matters into their own hands. They resolved to move forward with a check-off-like voluntary program called “GRO Organic” which stands for Generate Results and Opportunity. OTA and OV along with over […]

The demise of a mandatory organic research and promotion check-off program at the hands of the USDA came with great disappointment. It also kindled a fiery commitment to the idea that something must be done. Leading companies and individuals weren’t ready to give up the idea that collectively the organic industry could raise funds for […]

California has always been at the forefront of change in the food movement. It’s the state that first passed organic regulations in 1990 and birthed the first certifier, California Certified Organic Farmers (CCOF). The first Farm-to-School projects also sprang forth in the Golden State in 1997, at Santa Monica-Malibu United School District and The Edible […]

Google Peace Schnitzel It comes right up on the first page. Not on the second where it is said that dead bodies are buried. I was forever young and hopeful when I wrote it. Passionate about food and peace, and of course, schnitzels. So, I penned a piece for HuffPost called Peace Schnitzel. It’s there […]

I have witnessed Cathy Calfo’s vivacious drive since 2011 when she became the Executive Director of CCOF.  Since that time, she has been a friend, mentor, confidant and co-conspirator in advancing all things organic. During her eight-year tenure, she achieved many policy and advocacy successes for organic agriculture in California and the Nation. Cathy will […]

Conventional wisdom would tell us that eating food sprayed with toxic chemicals can’t be good for us. Avoiding flesh or fruit grown without poisons seems like a much healthier alternative. Now a groundbreaking study led by researchers at UC Berkeley, UC San Francisco and Friends of the Earth (FOE) reveals the benefits of an all-organic […]

  While a good portion of America was jostling around their televisions rooting for the winning touchdown, I was waiting for The Ad. Sunday’s primetime event heralded the first time in our nation’s history that millions of Americanswould witness and be inspired by the USDA Organic seal—all at the same time. The Michelob ULTRA Pure […]

You may ask why I should choose to reflect on the lowly onion. So pale and strong in its commonplace role in the kitchen. It marches forth into stews and soups alongside routine bedfellows of celery, carrot and spuds. We barely give onions a second thought as we shop and chop and cook. Yet, they […]

The federal government shutdown is going on its fourth week with no clear resolution in sight. According to estimates from S&P Global, the shutdown has already cost the U.S. economy $3.6 billion, and If it continues two more weeks, the economic damage could surpass $5.7 billion. The shutdown is causing issues for farmers across the nation. Local […]

I first met Rhyne Cureton at the “We Are Organic” CCOF Foundation dinner. He was the guest speaker as a CCOF Foundation 2018 grant recipient. He grew up in Charlotte, NC and attended North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University. I recently interviewed him. I first asked him to share what prompted him to choose agriculture […]

The end of the year has come and gone – a new year is upon us. I spent the holidays as a serial hostess, whipping up fine organic fare for friends and family. Yet the feasting and frolicking did not distract me from the news that affects the things I hold dear – Food and […]

Frey Vineyards is a third-generation family-owned and operated winery located at the pristine headwaters of the Russian River in Redwood Valley, in Mendocino County, CA. Jonathan and Katrina Frey met while apprenticing with the famed organic gardener, Alan Chadwick, in Covelo, CA in the 1970s. When they returned to the family farm, they gathered up […]

New Zealand is a narrow spit of a nation consisting of two elongated islands that almost kiss in the middle. Once part of the massive Gondwanan supercontinent,it drifted away and nestled in the far southwest of the Pacific Ocean. New Zealand then is the last landmass to be inhabited by humans. The Polynesians arrived by […]

After traveling through the rich green-scape of the North Island of New Zealand, I must turn myself away from geothermal explorations and culinary indulgences. It’s time for reentry into the stratosphere of business for a brief two days. Gary Hirshberg, Chairman of Stonyfield Organic, brought an expert group of industry veterans halfway across the world […]

I write from the Land of the Long White Cloud, New Zealand. While I was eating kamura wedges and savoring corn fritters, the people of the US were deciding who would represent them in the halls of Congress. I placed my vote via absentee ballot just before I left. These red-hot midterms sparked historic turnout. […]

Fresh n' Lean

Meal Prep Delivery Service

Blue Sky Organic Farms

Family Run. Locally Grown. Organic Food