Organic Farming Good Food For All

Organic Farming Good Food For All
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Organic Farming Good Food For All
Organic grocery
Organic Farming Good Food For All
Organic farming

Organic farming is another agricultural system that originated early in the 20th century in response to quickly changing farming techniques. Organic farming has been developed by several organic farming associations now. It depends on fertilizers of natural source like compost manure, green manure, and bone meal and puts emphasis on techniques like crop rotation and companion planting. Biological pest management, mixed cropping as well as the boosting of insect predators are all encouraged. Generally, organic standards are made to permit the utilization of naturally occurring compounds while banning or limiting synthetic materials. For example, naturally occurring pesticides like pyrethrin and rotenone are allowed, while artificial pesticides and fertilizers are usually prohibited. Synthetic substances which are permitted include, as an instance, aluminum sulfate, elemental sulfur and Ivermectin. Reasons for advocation of organic farming include benefits in sustainability, openness, self-sufficiency, autonomy/independence, wellness, food safety, and food security.

Reduced Exposure to Pesticides, Chemicals.
The Organic Trade Association notes if each farmer from the U.S. converted to organic production, we can remove 500 million pounds of harmful and persistent pesticides from going into the environment yearly. Pesticide and chemical usage contributes to several negative environmental dilemmas: 1.Pesticides permit disease immunity to accumulate in crops, weeds, plant-eating-insects, parasites, and bacteria. 2.Compounds and chemicals sprayed plants contaminate the soil, water source, and atmosphere. Occasionally these dangerous pesticides stay about for decades (possibly longer). 3.Artificial compounds also dissuade smart farming techniques like cover crops and crop rotation, which in turn, can cause other dangerous environmental issues like erosion.
Organic Farming Builds Healthy Soil.
To develop wholesome food, you have to begin with healthy soil. Should you treat the dirt with dangerous pesticides and chemicals, you might wind up with dirt which can't flourish by itself. Natural farming practices are much superior than compound soil administration. A sizable nine-year research by USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS), reveals that natural farming builds up organic soil issue better than traditional no-till farming. Based on Dr. Elaine Ingham, only 1 teaspoon of compost-rich organic dirt could host as many as 600 million to 1 billion beneficial germs from 15,000 species. Ingham notes on the reverse side, 1 teaspoon of soil treated with compounds may carry as much as 100 beneficial bacteria.
Combatting Erosion
Does organic farming build wholesome soil, but it also helps fight severe land and soil problems, like erosion. A significant research comparing adjacent natural and chemically treated wheat fields revealed that the organic area featured eight inches of topsoil compared to treated area and had only twenty the erosion reduction. In case you are not worried about erosion: you ought to be. Erosion problems are really severe, affecting the property, food distribution, and people. But, organic farming techniques do help discourage erosion from happening.
Assessing the Effects of Global Warming
Rodale Institute Farming Systems Trial is America's longest running, side-by-side contrast of traditional and organic farming. The trial, running since 1981, has demonstrated a wholesome organic agriculture system may actually reduce carbon dioxide and also help slow climate change. Actually, the Rodale study shows that: "If just 10,000 moderate sized farms in the U.S. converted into organic production, they'd save as much carbon from the soil it would be equal to carrying 1,174,400 automobiles off the street, or reducing automobile miles driven by 14.62 billion miles.
Organic Farming Supports Water Conservation and Water Health
Dwindling water supplies and inadequate water wellbeing are extremely real threats. When our water source is in danger, individuals and the world wind up suffering. American Rivers notes a significant water pollution threat to U.S ponds is runoff from non-organic farms, for example damaging pesticides, toxic fertilizers, and animal waste. Organic farming helps to keep our water supplies fresh by quitting that contaminated runoff. Organic farming also will help conserve water. Organic farmers, generally speaking, often devote some time amending soil properly and using mulch - both of which help preserve water. Cotton, an in-demand harvest, requires a great deal of irrigation and surplus water once grown conventionally. But, organic cotton farming requires less irrigation and so conserves water.
Discouraging Algal Blooms
Algal blooms (HABs) lead to adverse consequences on the health of individuals and marine creatures and organisms. Algal blooms also negatively impact tourism, diversion and so, regional and local markets. While there's more than 1 reason for algal blooms, a main human-based source of algae blooms is runoff in the petroleum-based fertilizers frequently utilized in traditional farming.
Supporting Animal Health and Welfare
Insects, fish, birds and all kinds of other creatures experience difficulties when individuals swoop in and destroy their habitat. Organic farming helps conserve more natural habitat regions but also promotes birds and other all-natural predators to live happily on farmland, which helps in pest control. Also, animals who reside on organic farms are vulnerable to wash, chemical-free grazing which can help keep them obviously healthy and immune to disease. As a benefit for organic farmers, healthy and happy natural animals are productive organic animals.​
Organic Farming Encourages Biodiversity
Insects, fish, birds and all kinds of other creatures experience difficulties when individuals swoop in and destroy their habitat. Organic farming helps conserve more natural habitat regions but also promotes birds and other all-natural predators to live happily on farmland, which helps in pest control. Also, animals who reside on organic farms are vulnerable to wash, chemical-free grazing which can help keep them obviously healthy and immune to disease. As a benefit for organic farmers, healthy and happy natural animals are productive organic animals.​

Why You Should Eat Buckwheat

It's time for you to meet buckwheat.

The post Why You Should Eat Buckwheat appeared first on Fresh n' Lean.


It's time for you to meet buckwheat.

The post Why You Should Eat Buckwheat appeared first on Fresh n' Lean.

Although it has a long history as a staple crop across Asia, it’s only recently that people in the West have begun to recognize buckwheat as the incredible superfood that it is.

Cooked buckwheat in bowl

Fagopyrum esculentum or common buckwheat is cropping up as the star of many plant-based recipes where it is valued for its nutritional content. A delicious addition to your diet, it’s time to discover what buckwheat can do for you.

What is Buckwheat?

While you might think of buckwheat as a grain, technically it is a grain-like seed or pseudocereal, like chia, amaranth, and quinoa.

Despite what its name may lead you to believe, buckwheat isn’t related to wheat. Rather, members of the buckwheat family include the likes of sorrel and rhubarb.

Like its fellow pseudocereal quinoa, buckwheat is gluten-free, making it an excellent part of a well-balanced diet for anyone with wheat sensitivities. It’s even used in the production of gluten-free spirits and beers. Whether you’re looking to reduce your gluten intake or find it necessary to avoid gluten altogether, these groats need to be on your radar.

Buckwheat Health Benefits

Buckwheat is a heavy hitter when it comes to nutritional content.

Buckwheat is rich in essential nutrients

This humble little seed is full of complex carbohydrates, protein, fiber, and several important minerals such as magnesium, manganese, zinc, and four B vitamins (B2, B3, B5, and B6).

Buckwheat has a variety of antioxidants

On top of all these essential nutrients, buckwheat also has a variety of antioxidants.

Antioxidants help protect the body from cell-damaging free radicals caused by the likes of smoke, alcohol, pollution, and overexposure to the sun.

In the case of buckwheat, it is full of polyphenols such as rutin, quercetin, and others which may help prevent cancer, heart disease, and other conditions.

Buckwheat could help with memory function

Studies show that buckwheat may have a variety of health benefits including neuroprotective properties, which could help with memory function in diseases like Alzheimer’s, reducing blood pressure, and thanks to its anti-inflammatory characteristics, may help reduce the risk of certain cancers and diabetes.

Buckwheat is low-glycemic

Speaking of diabetes, although it is relatively high in carbohydrates, buckwheat ranks fairly low on the glycemic index.

If you’re concerned about your blood sugar levels, be sure to try buckwheat.

Its low glycemic index score means that it is less likely to cause massive spike blood sugar spikes after you eat and may help regulate blood sugar levels after meals.

What Does Buckwheat Taste Like?

Buckwheat’s taste is part nutty, part earthy, with a touch of bitterness. When roasted, it takes on a richer, more intense flavor which can add much more complexity to your meal.

You can use it with a variety of other ingredients to create dynamic flavor combinations which make for delicious dishes that are never boring.

How to Eat Buckwheat

Buckwheat is ultra-versatile and easy to incorporate into your diet. You can use it as a substitute for everything from oats (try buckwheat porridge in the mornings) to rice (think buckwheat ‘risotto’) and much more.

It’s fantastic mixed into salads or used in lieu of bulgur wheat to make a tasty tabbouleh. There are even many buckwheat flours available on the market if you’re keen to get your baking hat on.

7 Easy Buckwheat Recipes

Need a little inspiration? Here are seven easy buckwheat recipes to try at home.

  1. Start your day with buckwheat pancakes or waffles. They’re a healthier option to the traditional flour recipes many of us grew up on and are perfect for anyone on a high-protein diet.
  2. Buckwheat protein bars make a great snack if you’re looking for something quick and easy to keep your energy levels up throughout the day. Make them at home for healthier alternatives to store bought protein bars. Try using a combination of chopped dates, your favorite dried berries, shredded coconut, and cacao powder.
  3. Gluten-free? Use buckwheat flour as a substitute in your favorite baking recipes. Buckwheat scones are great as a mid-afternoon snack, or if you’re in the mood for something sweet, buckwheat cocoa nib cookies will satisfy your sweet tooth.
  4. Pick up some buckwheat noodles (aka soba noodles) from your local supermarket and whip up a healthy stir-fry complete with plenty of vegetables. The beauty of buckwheat noodles is that they can be enjoyed hot or cold – ideal for summertime!
  5. Buckwheat is perfect in a salad with fresh or roasted vegetables. To get the most out of this protein-rich, tasty entrée, try using seasonal produce.
  6. Enjoy roasted buckwheat tea. This popular tea is consumed throughout China, Japan, and Korea and is a caffeine-free alternative to black and green teas. It makes an excellent low-calorie alternative to high-calorie drinks and when enjoyed instead of sugary drinks, can help you lose weight.

There’s no doubt about it. Adding buckwheat to your diet will have some serious positive health ramifications. A single serving of buckwheat will help you reach your daily protein and fiber needs while giving your body a hefty dose of complex carbohydrates to keep you going strong throughout the day. Beyond its health benefits, buckwheat is a full-flavored seed whose unique flavor will keep your inner gourmet very happy indeed.

The post Why You Should Eat Buckwheat appeared first on Fresh n' Lean.


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