Organic Farming Good Food For All

Organic Farming Good Food For All
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Organic Farming Good Food For All
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Organic Farming Good Food For All
Organic farming

Organic farming is another agricultural system that originated early in the 20th century in response to quickly changing farming techniques. Organic farming has been developed by several organic farming associations now. It depends on fertilizers of natural source like compost manure, green manure, and bone meal and puts emphasis on techniques like crop rotation and companion planting. Biological pest management, mixed cropping as well as the boosting of insect predators are all encouraged. Generally, organic standards are made to permit the utilization of naturally occurring compounds while banning or limiting synthetic materials. For example, naturally occurring pesticides like pyrethrin and rotenone are allowed, while artificial pesticides and fertilizers are usually prohibited. Synthetic substances which are permitted include, as an instance, aluminum sulfate, elemental sulfur and Ivermectin. Reasons for advocation of organic farming include benefits in sustainability, openness, self-sufficiency, autonomy/independence, wellness, food safety, and food security.

Reduced Exposure to Pesticides, Chemicals.
The Organic Trade Association notes if each farmer from the U.S. converted to organic production, we can remove 500 million pounds of harmful and persistent pesticides from going into the environment yearly. Pesticide and chemical usage contributes to several negative environmental dilemmas: 1.Pesticides permit disease immunity to accumulate in crops, weeds, plant-eating-insects, parasites, and bacteria. 2.Compounds and chemicals sprayed plants contaminate the soil, water source, and atmosphere. Occasionally these dangerous pesticides stay about for decades (possibly longer). 3.Artificial compounds also dissuade smart farming techniques like cover crops and crop rotation, which in turn, can cause other dangerous environmental issues like erosion.
Organic Farming Builds Healthy Soil.
To develop wholesome food, you have to begin with healthy soil. Should you treat the dirt with dangerous pesticides and chemicals, you might wind up with dirt which can't flourish by itself. Natural farming practices are much superior than compound soil administration. A sizable nine-year research by USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS), reveals that natural farming builds up organic soil issue better than traditional no-till farming. Based on Dr. Elaine Ingham, only 1 teaspoon of compost-rich organic dirt could host as many as 600 million to 1 billion beneficial germs from 15,000 species. Ingham notes on the reverse side, 1 teaspoon of soil treated with compounds may carry as much as 100 beneficial bacteria.
Combatting Erosion
Does organic farming build wholesome soil, but it also helps fight severe land and soil problems, like erosion. A significant research comparing adjacent natural and chemically treated wheat fields revealed that the organic area featured eight inches of topsoil compared to treated area and had only twenty the erosion reduction. In case you are not worried about erosion: you ought to be. Erosion problems are really severe, affecting the property, food distribution, and people. But, organic farming techniques do help discourage erosion from happening.
Assessing the Effects of Global Warming
Rodale Institute Farming Systems Trial is America's longest running, side-by-side contrast of traditional and organic farming. The trial, running since 1981, has demonstrated a wholesome organic agriculture system may actually reduce carbon dioxide and also help slow climate change. Actually, the Rodale study shows that: "If just 10,000 moderate sized farms in the U.S. converted into organic production, they'd save as much carbon from the soil it would be equal to carrying 1,174,400 automobiles off the street, or reducing automobile miles driven by 14.62 billion miles.
Organic Farming Supports Water Conservation and Water Health
Dwindling water supplies and inadequate water wellbeing are extremely real threats. When our water source is in danger, individuals and the world wind up suffering. American Rivers notes a significant water pollution threat to U.S ponds is runoff from non-organic farms, for example damaging pesticides, toxic fertilizers, and animal waste. Organic farming helps to keep our water supplies fresh by quitting that contaminated runoff. Organic farming also will help conserve water. Organic farmers, generally speaking, often devote some time amending soil properly and using mulch - both of which help preserve water. Cotton, an in-demand harvest, requires a great deal of irrigation and surplus water once grown conventionally. But, organic cotton farming requires less irrigation and so conserves water.
Discouraging Algal Blooms
Algal blooms (HABs) lead to adverse consequences on the health of individuals and marine creatures and organisms. Algal blooms also negatively impact tourism, diversion and so, regional and local markets. While there's more than 1 reason for algal blooms, a main human-based source of algae blooms is runoff in the petroleum-based fertilizers frequently utilized in traditional farming.
Supporting Animal Health and Welfare
Insects, fish, birds and all kinds of other creatures experience difficulties when individuals swoop in and destroy their habitat. Organic farming helps conserve more natural habitat regions but also promotes birds and other all-natural predators to live happily on farmland, which helps in pest control. Also, animals who reside on organic farms are vulnerable to wash, chemical-free grazing which can help keep them obviously healthy and immune to disease. As a benefit for organic farmers, healthy and happy natural animals are productive organic animals.​
Organic Farming Encourages Biodiversity
Insects, fish, birds and all kinds of other creatures experience difficulties when individuals swoop in and destroy their habitat. Organic farming helps conserve more natural habitat regions but also promotes birds and other all-natural predators to live happily on farmland, which helps in pest control. Also, animals who reside on organic farms are vulnerable to wash, chemical-free grazing which can help keep them obviously healthy and immune to disease. As a benefit for organic farmers, healthy and happy natural animals are productive organic animals.​

East Georgia’s Leaders in Organic Growing, Sam and Loretta Adderson

The Addersons’ farm sits off a narrow road in the tiny community of Keysville, Georgia. A long driveway, straight as an arrow, runs alongside the fields. Some are tilled and planted, some are covered in tall grasses and riotous yellow wildflowers. A small white house sits at the end of the driveway. Loretta sits under a […]

The post East Georgia’s Leaders in Organic Growing, Sam and Loretta Adderson appeared first on Georgia Organics.


The Addersons’ farm sits off a narrow road in the tiny community of Keysville, Georgia. A long driveway, straight as an arrow, runs alongside the fields. Some are tilled and planted, some are covered in tall grasses and riotous yellow wildflowers. A small white house sits at the end of the driveway. Loretta sits under a […]

The post East Georgia’s Leaders in Organic Growing, Sam and Loretta Adderson appeared first on Georgia Organics.

Loretta surveys a field of radishes gone to seed.

The Addersons’ farm sits off a narrow road in the tiny community of Keysville, Georgia. A long driveway, straight as an arrow, runs alongside the fields. Some are tilled and planted, some are covered in tall grasses and riotous yellow wildflowers. A small white house sits at the end of the driveway. Loretta sits under a canopy in the shade of a sprawling tree, sifting through binders of papers and writing out her apprenticeship plan. Loretta is seventy-five with curly grayish hair and a striped sunhat, and while she isn’t quite as mobile as she used to be, she’s sharp as a tack with a wit to match. 

Loretta’s parents owned the ninety-something acre farm and raised a variety of vegetables and animals there. She and her six brothers grew up in thsmall white house, doing the difficult and backbreaking work of helping to run the farm.  

“When I was young I used to come in the house every day at eleven—I’d have to kill and fry five chickens, and then I’d have to make ninety biscuits for my brothers.” 

Despite how hard she had to work as a girl and the hours and hours she spent laboring in the hot kitchen and in the blazing sun, Loretta feels an emotional connection to the farm and to her family’s work on the land. There’s a deep reverence in her voice when she speaks about her father.  

“People say a farmer can’t put his children through college, but my father did—all of his children that wanted to go went. He had to take out a lot of loans, but he did it.”  

Her husband and steadfast supporter of many years, Sam Adderson, drives his tractor across the fields. Keysville hasn’t seen rain in over a month, and the plow kicks up enormous clouds of dust. A dozen or so snowy white egrets follow the tractor, snapping up the grasshoppers disturbed by the plow.  

Sam slowly turns the tractor and drives towards the canopy to take a break. Sam clearly enjoys playing the grumpy farmer, complaining about the dust and the dry spell and the never-ending work. He’s awful at playing the part–he can’t stay in character, and often breaks out into chuckles as he complains about wasting the morning chatting.  

Sam and Loretta pretend to argue, Loretta telling him he forgot to turn on the drip irrigation for their lettuce, Sam telling her to take it easy and to not be so stubborn. They laugh as Sam reaches into a cooler and pulls out ice water for them to drink.  

“As a kid, I used to pick tobacco on my grandfather’s farm,” says Sam taking a sip. “This is hard work, but it sure beats picking tobacco.” Sam grew up in a tiny community in the South Carolina Lowcountry, “ten miles from Myrtle Beach as the crow flies, but twenty miles by boat through the rivers.” He met Loretta in college and they’ve been together ever since.  

Sam and Loretta returned to her family’s land in 2009 after they retired. Loretta spent her career working in nutrition, and she firmly believes in the power of food to heal. She wanted to be able to provide her family and her community with healthy, fresh, and organic produce.  

“When we began the farm, it wasn’t even a question of whether to be organic or not—there simply wasn’t another way for me,” she explains.  

Sam and Loretta have poured love, respect, and nurturing care into their land. Their long rows of watermelon radishes and Spanish black radishes bloom purple and white and are teeming with moths and butterflies. Sweet potatoes, newly planted, peek their slender greens out of the sandy, rich soil. A field of mustard greens, pale gold and dried in the sun, stand ready for Loretta to pick and save their seeds for next year. The farm is alive, and the Addersons gladly share the bounty with the insects and birds.  

The Addersons grow many heirloom varieties like watermelon radishes and the unbelievably spicy Spanish black radishes.

“If I see a cabbage or a collard green without any holes in it, the first thing I think is ‘what did they spray this with?’” says Loretta. The Addersons, although certified organic, go far beyond the stipulations of the USDA and don’t spray at all. The tiny holes in their produce prove that they allowed it to grow completely naturally.  

The Addersons pour the same love and nurturing care into their community that they do into their land—they get up early, both weekends and weekdays, to pack their produce into their truck and bring it to one of the roughly ten farmers markets they participate in. They sell their produce to communities without grocery stores, to people coming for treatment at a cancer center, to veterans at the VA hospital. They’ve taken dozens of growers under their wing, teaching them how to lay drip irrigation, how to dig potatoes, and how to care for the soil. They sell their produce to the Burke County schools so the students can taste a watermelon grown down the road instead of across the country. The Addersons give selflessly, out of a philosophy of caring for their community through food and farming.  

“One woman came to buy from us every week at the market. Her husband was undergoing cancer treatment, and because of his weakened immune system, he couldn’t handle any pesticides or herbicides on his food. He was so sick he could barely get out of bed. A few months later, she brought him to the market to visit us—he swears to this day that it was our produce that healed him,” explains Loretta.  

The Addersons are getting older, but they aren’t slowing down. They recently organized a co-op of thirty-one Black growers in East Georgia to pool resources and access wholesale markets. They signed on to the initial cohort of Georgia Organics’ Farm to Restaurant campaign to sell more to Atlanta restaurants. They took on an apprentice with help from a stipend from Georgia Organics. They are present at every workshop, event, and conference. They advocate tirelessly for access to better food and for grower education, for a sustainable way for them to pass on their extensive knowledge to other farmers.   

“Sam and Loretta Adderson are the spiritual and intellectual epicenter of the fastest growing organic hub in the state. They have taught me so much about working hard, surviving, and struggling and doing all that with an inner grace that transcends the literal blood, sweat, and tears they have endured,” explains Michael Wall, who has worked with the Addersons throughout much of his tenure as Georgia Organics’ Farmer Services Director.  

I can’t and won’t quit because I know Mr. Sam and Mrs. Loretta can’t and won’t quit, and I know there are dozens of farmers and advocates in this movement who feel the same way. 

 

 

Scroll down for more photos of the Addersons’ farm. 

 

 

 

Sam Adderson has been driving a tractor since he could reach the pedals. 

 

 

The Addersons’ farm is beautiful, with fields of perennial grasses and wildflowers. These fields act as buffers, protecting their crops from pests and disease, while providing a home for beneficial insects and pollinators.                    

 

 

Sam and Loretta’s hives. Their honey is fiercely sought after in the region.

 

 

Loretta inspects a row of watermelon radishes, a popular item at the farmers market. The radishes are easy to pull from the loose, sandy soil. 

 

 

A field of mustard greens, gone to seed and dried in the hot sun. The Addersons will save some for next year–certified organic seeds can be quite expensive. The rest will be made into mustard. 

The post East Georgia’s Leaders in Organic Growing, Sam and Loretta Adderson appeared first on Georgia Organics.


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