Organic Farming Good Food For All

Organic Farming Good Food For All
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Organic Farming Good Food For All
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Organic Farming Good Food For All
Organic farming

Organic farming is another agricultural system that originated early in the 20th century in response to quickly changing farming techniques. Organic farming has been developed by several organic farming associations now. It depends on fertilizers of natural source like compost manure, green manure, and bone meal and puts emphasis on techniques like crop rotation and companion planting. Biological pest management, mixed cropping as well as the boosting of insect predators are all encouraged. Generally, organic standards are made to permit the utilization of naturally occurring compounds while banning or limiting synthetic materials. For example, naturally occurring pesticides like pyrethrin and rotenone are allowed, while artificial pesticides and fertilizers are usually prohibited. Synthetic substances which are permitted include, as an instance, aluminum sulfate, elemental sulfur and Ivermectin. Reasons for advocation of organic farming include benefits in sustainability, openness, self-sufficiency, autonomy/independence, wellness, food safety, and food security.

Reduced Exposure to Pesticides, Chemicals.
The Organic Trade Association notes if each farmer from the U.S. converted to organic production, we can remove 500 million pounds of harmful and persistent pesticides from going into the environment yearly. Pesticide and chemical usage contributes to several negative environmental dilemmas: 1.Pesticides permit disease immunity to accumulate in crops, weeds, plant-eating-insects, parasites, and bacteria. 2.Compounds and chemicals sprayed plants contaminate the soil, water source, and atmosphere. Occasionally these dangerous pesticides stay about for decades (possibly longer). 3.Artificial compounds also dissuade smart farming techniques like cover crops and crop rotation, which in turn, can cause other dangerous environmental issues like erosion.
Organic Farming Builds Healthy Soil.
To develop wholesome food, you have to begin with healthy soil. Should you treat the dirt with dangerous pesticides and chemicals, you might wind up with dirt which can't flourish by itself. Natural farming practices are much superior than compound soil administration. A sizable nine-year research by USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS), reveals that natural farming builds up organic soil issue better than traditional no-till farming. Based on Dr. Elaine Ingham, only 1 teaspoon of compost-rich organic dirt could host as many as 600 million to 1 billion beneficial germs from 15,000 species. Ingham notes on the reverse side, 1 teaspoon of soil treated with compounds may carry as much as 100 beneficial bacteria.
Combatting Erosion
Does organic farming build wholesome soil, but it also helps fight severe land and soil problems, like erosion. A significant research comparing adjacent natural and chemically treated wheat fields revealed that the organic area featured eight inches of topsoil compared to treated area and had only twenty the erosion reduction. In case you are not worried about erosion: you ought to be. Erosion problems are really severe, affecting the property, food distribution, and people. But, organic farming techniques do help discourage erosion from happening.
Assessing the Effects of Global Warming
Rodale Institute Farming Systems Trial is America's longest running, side-by-side contrast of traditional and organic farming. The trial, running since 1981, has demonstrated a wholesome organic agriculture system may actually reduce carbon dioxide and also help slow climate change. Actually, the Rodale study shows that: "If just 10,000 moderate sized farms in the U.S. converted into organic production, they'd save as much carbon from the soil it would be equal to carrying 1,174,400 automobiles off the street, or reducing automobile miles driven by 14.62 billion miles.
Organic Farming Supports Water Conservation and Water Health
Dwindling water supplies and inadequate water wellbeing are extremely real threats. When our water source is in danger, individuals and the world wind up suffering. American Rivers notes a significant water pollution threat to U.S ponds is runoff from non-organic farms, for example damaging pesticides, toxic fertilizers, and animal waste. Organic farming helps to keep our water supplies fresh by quitting that contaminated runoff. Organic farming also will help conserve water. Organic farmers, generally speaking, often devote some time amending soil properly and using mulch - both of which help preserve water. Cotton, an in-demand harvest, requires a great deal of irrigation and surplus water once grown conventionally. But, organic cotton farming requires less irrigation and so conserves water.
Discouraging Algal Blooms
Algal blooms (HABs) lead to adverse consequences on the health of individuals and marine creatures and organisms. Algal blooms also negatively impact tourism, diversion and so, regional and local markets. While there's more than 1 reason for algal blooms, a main human-based source of algae blooms is runoff in the petroleum-based fertilizers frequently utilized in traditional farming.
Supporting Animal Health and Welfare
Insects, fish, birds and all kinds of other creatures experience difficulties when individuals swoop in and destroy their habitat. Organic farming helps conserve more natural habitat regions but also promotes birds and other all-natural predators to live happily on farmland, which helps in pest control. Also, animals who reside on organic farms are vulnerable to wash, chemical-free grazing which can help keep them obviously healthy and immune to disease. As a benefit for organic farmers, healthy and happy natural animals are productive organic animals.​
Organic Farming Encourages Biodiversity
Insects, fish, birds and all kinds of other creatures experience difficulties when individuals swoop in and destroy their habitat. Organic farming helps conserve more natural habitat regions but also promotes birds and other all-natural predators to live happily on farmland, which helps in pest control. Also, animals who reside on organic farms are vulnerable to wash, chemical-free grazing which can help keep them obviously healthy and immune to disease. As a benefit for organic farmers, healthy and happy natural animals are productive organic animals.​

Food is Medicine for the Gilliam Family

By Porter Mitchell When West End farmer Lovey Gilliam’s mother was undergoing chemotherapy for her cancer, Lovey was shocked to see how her diet declined. She lacked the energy and the time to cook, so she relied heavily on fast foods and convenience foods–to the detriment of her health. Alarmed at her mother’s worsening condition, and unable to leave her Atlanta farm to tend […]

The post Food is Medicine for the Gilliam Family appeared first on Georgia Organics.


By Porter Mitchell When West End farmer Lovey Gilliam’s mother was undergoing chemotherapy for her cancer, Lovey was shocked to see how her diet declined. She lacked the energy and the time to cook, so she relied heavily on fast foods and convenience foods–to the detriment of her health. Alarmed at her mother’s worsening condition, and unable to leave her Atlanta farm to tend […]

The post Food is Medicine for the Gilliam Family appeared first on Georgia Organics.

By Porter Mitchell

When West End farmer Lovey Gilliam’s mother was undergoing chemotherapy for her cancer, Lovey was shocked to see how her diet declined. She lacked the energy and the time to cook, so she relied heavily on fast foods and convenience foods–to the detriment of her health.

Alarmed at her mother’s worsening condition, and unable to leave her Atlanta farm to tend to her mother full-time in New York, Lovey suggested that she get a Crock Pot to make cooking at home easier. It worked. Lovey’s mother began cooking more and more at home, using the Crock Pot to make hearty, hot meals for herself with only minimal effort. Her mother began to slowly regain her strength and her health.   

Lovey knew her mother couldn’t be the only senior who turned to fast food because they didn’t have the time or energy to cook.  Lovey approached Morehouse School of Medicine, and in 2018 they conducted a study of local seniors’ diets. The results were shocking. The study uncovered an epidemic of poor nutrition and diet amongst seniors, with many of them relying primarily on fast food for nourishment. This unhealthy diet exacerbated illnesses like high blood pressure and diabetes, and created a vicious cycle of declining health, declining diet, and declining quality of life.  

Lovey knew that these seniors needed an immediate intervention. What if what worked for her mother could also work for other seniors? Lovey teamed up with the senior healthcare center JenCare to launch Project Madeline, named after Lovey’s mother.  

Project Madeline provides participating seniors at JenCare centers with a Crock Pot, a monthly class on healthy eating, healthy lifestyles, and on culinary skills, as well as a hefty bag of fresh produce from Lovey’s farm.  

It’s the second Project Madeline class, and the seniors sit at tables set up in rows in the farm’s outdoor classroom.  They chat about the sunny April weather, the dozen or so chickens pecking and scratching in the pen behind them, and the straight rows of almost neon-green vegetables growing in the farm’s raised beds.   

Lovey and her volunteer Susan Cowser-Bailey bustle about, making sure the seniors all have a glass of cold iced tea or fruit and herb infused water before the program begins.  

“Many people come to me and tell me, ‘I don’t want to take medicine.’ And I tell them, what are you doing to not take medicine?” announces Lisa Graham, an RN/BSN and diabetes educator who works with JenCare as she walks in front of the group.  

Lisa’s talk on exercise, the importance of proper hydration, and healthier culinary substitutions clearly resonates with the seniors, who eagerly raise their hands and ask her a myriad of questions on cooking methods, food additives, healthier drink choices, and on demystifying the wild health claims of fad foods like alkaline water. 

Lisa leans hard into her point that eating healthier, exercising more, and drinking more water doesn’t have to be an all-or-nothing endeavor—small changes add up. “People tell me, ‘well I don’t exercise, I just walk a little’—that is exercise!” she exclaims.   

Lisa’s presentation is followed by a Crock Pot cooking class from Chef Mwandisha. She shares anecdotes of her own journey to healthy eating, easy cooking tips and tricks, and how to create more exciting vegetable-based dishes as she cheerfully chops sweet potatoes and bok choi. Lovey passes out samples of Chef Mwandisha’s sweet potato, greens, and apple Crock Pot dish to the seniors, who nod and “Mmm!” in approval. At the end of the class, the seniors receive Mwandisha’s recipe and an overflowing grocery bag of Lovey’s produce. They chat and laugh with each other and swarm Lovey, Lisa, and Mwandisha with more questions.   

“I want to be healthier, so this is great. And I can share this knowledge with others!” exclaimed Diana Williams, a West End senior.  

“This is my second class, I attended the one last month as well. The Crock Pot has really worked for me! I can’t wait for the next class, I definitely don’t want to miss it!” says Lydia Beasley excitedly. Her friend, Tina Demere, a tall woman in a colorful blazer, pulls out a long, leafy stem with bright yellow flowers from her bag.  “I’ve never tried bok choi before, but I really like it. It’s great in salads!” 

The phrase “food is medicine” gets tossed around a lot. We hear it on the news, on online think-pieces, in conversation amongst our friends and family. But what does “food is medicine” mean? What does it actually look like to see health and wellness through the lens of diet? What is “food is medicine” in action?  

Project Madeline is food is medicine in practice, and a farmer is at the forefront of it.  

“We have more growers and gardeners than we do grocery stores—we can create and thrive in our community by eating from it,” explains Chef Mwandisha 

Farms like Gilliam’s Community Garden not only steward the land and provide produce, but they are critical players in a community’s health. By providing fresh fruits and vegetables, a space to come and learn, and by partnering with other community organizations, small farms can catalyze positive change in their communities.  

Lovey’s mother is in remission now. A ballerina who owned her own ballet school in Harlem, she is finally able to dance again. Her hair, which was snow-white before chemo, has grown back a remarkable jet-black. She credits her renewed vitality and her recovery from chemotherapy to her improved diet. 

After the seniors board the shuttle to return to their homes, Lovey leans against the outdoor classroom’s railing.  She gazes at one of her hoop houses, its shade cloth rustling quietly in the breeze, and turns and says firmly, “If you don’t make time for your health, you will make time for your illness.

To learn more about Gilliam’s Community Gardens, visit www.gilliamscommunityfarm.com.

The post Food is Medicine for the Gilliam Family appeared first on Georgia Organics.


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