Organic Farming Good Food For All

Organic Farming Good Food For All
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Organic Farming Good Food For All
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Organic Farming Good Food For All
Organic farming

Organic farming is another agricultural system that originated early in the 20th century in response to quickly changing farming techniques. Organic farming has been developed by several organic farming associations now. It depends on fertilizers of natural source like compost manure, green manure, and bone meal and puts emphasis on techniques like crop rotation and companion planting. Biological pest management, mixed cropping as well as the boosting of insect predators are all encouraged. Generally, organic standards are made to permit the utilization of naturally occurring compounds while banning or limiting synthetic materials. For example, naturally occurring pesticides like pyrethrin and rotenone are allowed, while artificial pesticides and fertilizers are usually prohibited. Synthetic substances which are permitted include, as an instance, aluminum sulfate, elemental sulfur and Ivermectin. Reasons for advocation of organic farming include benefits in sustainability, openness, self-sufficiency, autonomy/independence, wellness, food safety, and food security.

Reduced Exposure to Pesticides, Chemicals.
The Organic Trade Association notes if each farmer from the U.S. converted to organic production, we can remove 500 million pounds of harmful and persistent pesticides from going into the environment yearly. Pesticide and chemical usage contributes to several negative environmental dilemmas: 1.Pesticides permit disease immunity to accumulate in crops, weeds, plant-eating-insects, parasites, and bacteria. 2.Compounds and chemicals sprayed plants contaminate the soil, water source, and atmosphere. Occasionally these dangerous pesticides stay about for decades (possibly longer). 3.Artificial compounds also dissuade smart farming techniques like cover crops and crop rotation, which in turn, can cause other dangerous environmental issues like erosion.
Organic Farming Builds Healthy Soil.
To develop wholesome food, you have to begin with healthy soil. Should you treat the dirt with dangerous pesticides and chemicals, you might wind up with dirt which can't flourish by itself. Natural farming practices are much superior than compound soil administration. A sizable nine-year research by USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS), reveals that natural farming builds up organic soil issue better than traditional no-till farming. Based on Dr. Elaine Ingham, only 1 teaspoon of compost-rich organic dirt could host as many as 600 million to 1 billion beneficial germs from 15,000 species. Ingham notes on the reverse side, 1 teaspoon of soil treated with compounds may carry as much as 100 beneficial bacteria.
Combatting Erosion
Does organic farming build wholesome soil, but it also helps fight severe land and soil problems, like erosion. A significant research comparing adjacent natural and chemically treated wheat fields revealed that the organic area featured eight inches of topsoil compared to treated area and had only twenty the erosion reduction. In case you are not worried about erosion: you ought to be. Erosion problems are really severe, affecting the property, food distribution, and people. But, organic farming techniques do help discourage erosion from happening.
Assessing the Effects of Global Warming
Rodale Institute Farming Systems Trial is America's longest running, side-by-side contrast of traditional and organic farming. The trial, running since 1981, has demonstrated a wholesome organic agriculture system may actually reduce carbon dioxide and also help slow climate change. Actually, the Rodale study shows that: "If just 10,000 moderate sized farms in the U.S. converted into organic production, they'd save as much carbon from the soil it would be equal to carrying 1,174,400 automobiles off the street, or reducing automobile miles driven by 14.62 billion miles.
Organic Farming Supports Water Conservation and Water Health
Dwindling water supplies and inadequate water wellbeing are extremely real threats. When our water source is in danger, individuals and the world wind up suffering. American Rivers notes a significant water pollution threat to U.S ponds is runoff from non-organic farms, for example damaging pesticides, toxic fertilizers, and animal waste. Organic farming helps to keep our water supplies fresh by quitting that contaminated runoff. Organic farming also will help conserve water. Organic farmers, generally speaking, often devote some time amending soil properly and using mulch - both of which help preserve water. Cotton, an in-demand harvest, requires a great deal of irrigation and surplus water once grown conventionally. But, organic cotton farming requires less irrigation and so conserves water.
Discouraging Algal Blooms
Algal blooms (HABs) lead to adverse consequences on the health of individuals and marine creatures and organisms. Algal blooms also negatively impact tourism, diversion and so, regional and local markets. While there's more than 1 reason for algal blooms, a main human-based source of algae blooms is runoff in the petroleum-based fertilizers frequently utilized in traditional farming.
Supporting Animal Health and Welfare
Insects, fish, birds and all kinds of other creatures experience difficulties when individuals swoop in and destroy their habitat. Organic farming helps conserve more natural habitat regions but also promotes birds and other all-natural predators to live happily on farmland, which helps in pest control. Also, animals who reside on organic farms are vulnerable to wash, chemical-free grazing which can help keep them obviously healthy and immune to disease. As a benefit for organic farmers, healthy and happy natural animals are productive organic animals.​
Organic Farming Encourages Biodiversity
Insects, fish, birds and all kinds of other creatures experience difficulties when individuals swoop in and destroy their habitat. Organic farming helps conserve more natural habitat regions but also promotes birds and other all-natural predators to live happily on farmland, which helps in pest control. Also, animals who reside on organic farms are vulnerable to wash, chemical-free grazing which can help keep them obviously healthy and immune to disease. As a benefit for organic farmers, healthy and happy natural animals are productive organic animals.​

BEHIND THE SUMMIT: Dr. Linette Dodson

By Renee De Shay Dr. Linette Dodson is a keynote speaker at this year’s Farm to School and Early Care Education Summit. Linette is the Director of School Nutrition for Carrollton City Schools in Carrollton, Ga and has been for nearly 20 years. Throughout her tenure, she’s built an award-winning nutrition and Farm to School program. Carrollton City Schools’ […]

The post BEHIND THE SUMMIT: Dr. Linette Dodson appeared first on Georgia Organics.


By Renee De Shay Dr. Linette Dodson is a keynote speaker at this year’s Farm to School and Early Care Education Summit. Linette is the Director of School Nutrition for Carrollton City Schools in Carrollton, Ga and has been for nearly 20 years. Throughout her tenure, she’s built an award-winning nutrition and Farm to School program. Carrollton City Schools’ […]

The post BEHIND THE SUMMIT: Dr. Linette Dodson appeared first on Georgia Organics.

By Renee De Shay

Linette and Fall Culinary Club Graduation

Dr. Linette Dodson is a keynote speaker at this year’s Farm to School and Early Care Education Summit. Linette is the Director of School Nutrition for Carrollton City Schools in Carrollton, Ga and has been for nearly 20 yearsThroughout her tenure, she’s built an award-winning nutrition and Farm to School program. Carrollton City Schools’ Farm to School program includes STEM-focused school gardening, an after school culinary club, locally-sourced food from more than 25 farmers, hundreds of taste tests, community collaborations, farm field trips, and even a food truck for school meals and celebrations. It should come as no surprise that Carrollton City Schools won Platinum recognition and the Outstanding District Award at the 2018 Golden Radish Awards. 

Linette earned her PhD from Iowa State University. Her research focused on registered dietitians in school nutrition leadership roles and dietetic students’ interest in school nutrition leadership. She serves on the Georgia Dietetic Licensing Board, the Georgia School Nutrition Association (GNSA), and the Department of Public Health’s Internship Advisory Board. 

Linette is a warm, engaging speaker with years of experience in nutrition and Farm to School. 

Could you give a short “teaser trailer” about what you will cover in your keynote? 

“Obviously, it will be about creating a sustainable Farm to School program, but specifically about incorporating the classroom, cafeteria and community, really for the purpose of educating the whole child.”

Tell me about your Farm to School journey. 

“We dabbled in it before 2013, with nutrition in the classroom. Then in early 2013, we received our first USDA funded school grant, which allowed us to be more purposeful in Farm to School.”

The grant gave Linette the resources to build the infrastructure of Farm to School, train staff, hire a food service manager, and focus the nutrition education on academic standards. They received their second USDA grant in 2017, which provided more resources for schools and teachers delivering nutrition education. Linette feels the program is integrated well into their schools, especially the elementary schoolsThey are now working on growing the Farm to School program in their middle schools.  

“A lot of people think Farm to School is school gardens, but it’s a lot bigger than that,” said Linette. “Farm to School has that, but to be a more inclusive program, it has to be evident in more areas than just school gardens.” 

Excellent Farm to School programs like the one in Carrollton City Schools don’t happen overnight. “It’s been a process,” Linette said, “You kinda have to figure out where the best place is to start for you.” 

For Linette, the meal program was the easiest place to start because she could control procurement, the type of food served, and staff training. From there, she tackled nutrition education in the classroom and started building community support for the program. She found the most challenging piece was getting people to understand what she was doing with school nutrition. 

For us, it was really making the connections between the classrooms, cafeteria, and community—bringing all of that together, she said. 

Why would you encourage school staff to attend Summit? 

“I think for the staff, it’s very rewarding to attend the summit. Our school staff looks at Farm to School in a lot of different ways. They’re the front line people delivering it and I feel like it gives us a more balanced approach if we have different levels of staff that attend. It also gives them more buy-in and ability to discuss and support Farm to School at the school level.”

Being able to understand and discuss farm to school is important to Linette. “That’s been a focus of ours,” she said. “We want our employees to be able to talk about the Farm to School effort, and to be able to talk about it in the community.” 

What are you most excited about for Summit? 

“The ability to network is huge. The more we all share about successes at Farm to School, the better we’ll be able to do it.”

Linette finds others’ experiences with Farm to School encouraging. “I like to share what we’re doing, but I also like to hear what other people are doing,” she said. It’s a continual improvement process, and we don’t think we’ve achieved all there is to achieve with Farm to SchoolWe want to continually move forward. 


Presented by Georgia Farm to School Alliance and Georgia Farm to Early Care and Coalition, hosted by the Georgia Department of Early Care and Learning and Georgia Organics.

The farm to early care and education (farm to ECE) and farm to school movement connects early care providers, schools, and local farms in an effort to serve healthy meals and snacks, improve student nutrition, and increase farm and gardening educational opportunities. This year’s Summit welcomes early care providers and staff, teachers, school nutrition staff, students, parents, farmers, distributors, and others interested in learning more about Georgia’s farm to ECE and  farm to school community.

Click HERE to register. Full and partial scholarships are available.  Applications close April 11. Click HERE to apply.

The post BEHIND THE SUMMIT: Dr. Linette Dodson appeared first on Georgia Organics.


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