Organic Farming Good Food For All

Organic Farming Good Food For All
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Organic Farming Good Food For All
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Organic Farming Good Food For All
Organic farming

Organic farming is another agricultural system that originated early in the 20th century in response to quickly changing farming techniques. Organic farming has been developed by several organic farming associations now. It depends on fertilizers of natural source like compost manure, green manure, and bone meal and puts emphasis on techniques like crop rotation and companion planting. Biological pest management, mixed cropping as well as the boosting of insect predators are all encouraged. Generally, organic standards are made to permit the utilization of naturally occurring compounds while banning or limiting synthetic materials. For example, naturally occurring pesticides like pyrethrin and rotenone are allowed, while artificial pesticides and fertilizers are usually prohibited. Synthetic substances which are permitted include, as an instance, aluminum sulfate, elemental sulfur and Ivermectin. Reasons for advocation of organic farming include benefits in sustainability, openness, self-sufficiency, autonomy/independence, wellness, food safety, and food security.

Reduced Exposure to Pesticides, Chemicals.
The Organic Trade Association notes if each farmer from the U.S. converted to organic production, we can remove 500 million pounds of harmful and persistent pesticides from going into the environment yearly. Pesticide and chemical usage contributes to several negative environmental dilemmas: 1.Pesticides permit disease immunity to accumulate in crops, weeds, plant-eating-insects, parasites, and bacteria. 2.Compounds and chemicals sprayed plants contaminate the soil, water source, and atmosphere. Occasionally these dangerous pesticides stay about for decades (possibly longer). 3.Artificial compounds also dissuade smart farming techniques like cover crops and crop rotation, which in turn, can cause other dangerous environmental issues like erosion.
Organic Farming Builds Healthy Soil.
To develop wholesome food, you have to begin with healthy soil. Should you treat the dirt with dangerous pesticides and chemicals, you might wind up with dirt which can't flourish by itself. Natural farming practices are much superior than compound soil administration. A sizable nine-year research by USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS), reveals that natural farming builds up organic soil issue better than traditional no-till farming. Based on Dr. Elaine Ingham, only 1 teaspoon of compost-rich organic dirt could host as many as 600 million to 1 billion beneficial germs from 15,000 species. Ingham notes on the reverse side, 1 teaspoon of soil treated with compounds may carry as much as 100 beneficial bacteria.
Combatting Erosion
Does organic farming build wholesome soil, but it also helps fight severe land and soil problems, like erosion. A significant research comparing adjacent natural and chemically treated wheat fields revealed that the organic area featured eight inches of topsoil compared to treated area and had only twenty the erosion reduction. In case you are not worried about erosion: you ought to be. Erosion problems are really severe, affecting the property, food distribution, and people. But, organic farming techniques do help discourage erosion from happening.
Assessing the Effects of Global Warming
Rodale Institute Farming Systems Trial is America's longest running, side-by-side contrast of traditional and organic farming. The trial, running since 1981, has demonstrated a wholesome organic agriculture system may actually reduce carbon dioxide and also help slow climate change. Actually, the Rodale study shows that: "If just 10,000 moderate sized farms in the U.S. converted into organic production, they'd save as much carbon from the soil it would be equal to carrying 1,174,400 automobiles off the street, or reducing automobile miles driven by 14.62 billion miles.
Organic Farming Supports Water Conservation and Water Health
Dwindling water supplies and inadequate water wellbeing are extremely real threats. When our water source is in danger, individuals and the world wind up suffering. American Rivers notes a significant water pollution threat to U.S ponds is runoff from non-organic farms, for example damaging pesticides, toxic fertilizers, and animal waste. Organic farming helps to keep our water supplies fresh by quitting that contaminated runoff. Organic farming also will help conserve water. Organic farmers, generally speaking, often devote some time amending soil properly and using mulch - both of which help preserve water. Cotton, an in-demand harvest, requires a great deal of irrigation and surplus water once grown conventionally. But, organic cotton farming requires less irrigation and so conserves water.
Discouraging Algal Blooms
Algal blooms (HABs) lead to adverse consequences on the health of individuals and marine creatures and organisms. Algal blooms also negatively impact tourism, diversion and so, regional and local markets. While there's more than 1 reason for algal blooms, a main human-based source of algae blooms is runoff in the petroleum-based fertilizers frequently utilized in traditional farming.
Supporting Animal Health and Welfare
Insects, fish, birds and all kinds of other creatures experience difficulties when individuals swoop in and destroy their habitat. Organic farming helps conserve more natural habitat regions but also promotes birds and other all-natural predators to live happily on farmland, which helps in pest control. Also, animals who reside on organic farms are vulnerable to wash, chemical-free grazing which can help keep them obviously healthy and immune to disease. As a benefit for organic farmers, healthy and happy natural animals are productive organic animals.​
Organic Farming Encourages Biodiversity
Insects, fish, birds and all kinds of other creatures experience difficulties when individuals swoop in and destroy their habitat. Organic farming helps conserve more natural habitat regions but also promotes birds and other all-natural predators to live happily on farmland, which helps in pest control. Also, animals who reside on organic farms are vulnerable to wash, chemical-free grazing which can help keep them obviously healthy and immune to disease. As a benefit for organic farmers, healthy and happy natural animals are productive organic animals.​

Burgess Peterson’s Orchard and Garden Celebrates Ten Years

by Angel Mills By Angel Mills Burgess Peterson Academy’s (BPA) celebrated the tenth anniversary of its fruit tree orchard and garden on April 12 at its pre-K-5 campus in East Atlanta. Students, teachers, parents, and community members participated in the celebration, which included a full day of events – starting with a half-day teacher training […]

The post Burgess Peterson’s Orchard and Garden Celebrates Ten Years appeared first on Georgia Organics.


by Angel Mills By Angel Mills Burgess Peterson Academy’s (BPA) celebrated the tenth anniversary of its fruit tree orchard and garden on April 12 at its pre-K-5 campus in East Atlanta. Students, teachers, parents, and community members participated in the celebration, which included a full day of events – starting with a half-day teacher training […]

The post Burgess Peterson’s Orchard and Garden Celebrates Ten Years appeared first on Georgia Organics.

by Angel Mills

Entrance of Burgess Peterson Academy’s School Garden

By Angel Mills

Burgess Peterson Academy’s (BPA) celebrated the tenth anniversary of its fruit tree orchard and garden on April 12 at its pre-K-5 campus in East Atlanta.

Students, teachers, parents, and community members participated in the celebration, which included a full day of events – starting with a half-day teacher training in the afternoon followed by a free fruit tree planting class taught by Robby Astrove (Ranger Robby), and a community potluck in the evening.

Georgia Organics partnered with Community Farmers Markets (CFM) to host a skills-based training for BPA teachers and parents. CFM’s Director of Education Programs and Outreach Jenna Mobley led the training. She shared approximately 15-20 Georgia standards based lessons teachers can use to integrate the school garden, orchard, cooking, and taste tests into curriculum lessons.

“It was really special to have so many teachers from BPA here today,” Jenna said. “This really shows that every single faculty member here is invested in this work!”

Some of the learning activities Jenna taught included:

  • Reflective writing exercises focused around student experiences in the garden and orchard
  • Encouraging students to track planting, ripening, and harvesting progress on a classroom calendar
  • Incorporating kinesthetic activity by teaching students various movements to associate with the growing process
  • Asking students questions while in the garden to engage all five of their senses
  • Playing games like the “pollinator and plant” matching activity to help students identify food plants and the animals that pollinate them.
  • Challenging students to quantify their observations by bringing measuring tools into the garden to track changes and differences over time

Fun Pro Tip:

When doing a taste test encourage students to take a “no thank you” bite if they are hesitant to try new foods. – Source: Erin Croom

Teachers participating in a “apple variety” taste test.

“I learned a lot about how we can integrate the garden into our curriculum and teaching. I have special education kids and these examples I got are a new way for me to teach my students.” – Workshop Participant and BPA Educator, Sonia Mair, Ph.d.

Burgess Peterson Academy’s Orchard

BPA, CFM, and Georgia Organics proudly welcomed the return of Coach Betty Jackson and former Parent Teacher Association President Chrisman (Chris) Hampton to the training and subsequent festivities. Coach Jackson was a storied P.E. teacher at BPA and worked with Georgia Organics’ Erin Croom, current Georgia Organics Board Chair and Farmer Joe Reynolds of Love is Love Farm, and the Southeast Atlanta neighborhood association to receive assistance in securing the funding to develop BPA’s now blossoming garden, orchard, and playground equipment.

“It’s so important to have a good support system,” Coach Jackson told attendees during her presentation detailing the history of the garden and orchard.

While Coach Jackson worked tirelessly to complete lengthy grant applications, volunteers like former BPA PTA President Chris and a host of other volunteers including master gardeners Michelle Rice, Adam Waterson, and Ranger Robby worked to build the garden and orchard and later it’s water conservation system. Chris fondly remembers lugging dirt and other heavy gardening items as well as accepting shipments of ordered items when Coach Jackson was unable to do so. He called the garden and orchard development process “hard work” but a “labor of love”. “Coach Jackson was like a mad scientist, you never knew what was going on until it was finished,” he said. “When it was finished I said ohhhh that’s what we were doing.” He explained that he was happy to help out and see the finished product.

Numerous chefs including Chef Todd Richards of Richards Southern Fried and friend of the Cast Iron and Collards Society visited the school throughout Coach Jackson’s tenure there. These chefs led farm to plate cooking lessons teaching students how to harvest produce from the garden and transform it into a delicious meal.

Coach Jackson retired in 2015, and is very pleased with the progress of the garden and orchard throughout the past 10 years. “It’s just really a good site,” she said. “They have expanded the garden and it’s so much more cohesive. You can tell where everything else and everything’s growing.” Coach Jackson even mentioned that she planned to pick a few items and take them home for herself!

Today, BPA’s orchard and garden are truly flourishing. School administrators have even added a chicken coop to the garden with approximately 12 chickens inside. Students now work in the garden and orchard as part of their learning plans.

Burgess Peterson Academy’s School Garden Chicken Coop

There are a lot of really wonderful resources out there that help kids of all ages learn what they need to through hands-on nutrition and agriculture education. Our Georgia Organics Farm to School team has compiled several for you. Click HERE to check them out.

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Georgia Farm to School and Early Care Summit

The Seventh Georgia Farm to School and Early Care and Education Summit will be hosted June 7-8 at Helms College in Macon, Ga. Registration is open NOW.

The farm to early care and education (farm to ECE) and farm to school movement connects early care providers, schools, and local farms in an effort to serve healthy meals and snacks, improve student nutrition, and increase farm and gardening educational opportunities. This year’s Summit welcomes early care providers and staff, teachers, school nutrition staff, students, parents, farmers, distributors, and others interested in learning more about Georgia’s farm to ECE and  farm to school community.

2019 Golden Radish Awards

The 2019 Golden Radish Application is Open!

APPLY HERE

About the Golden Radish Award Application Process

1. Review the Award Criteria for your size district/LEA:

Criteria for School Districts and LEAs of 1-2 Schools

Criteria for School Districts and LEAs of 3-15 Schools

Criteria for School Districts and LEAs of 16-50 Schools

Criteria for School Districts and LEAs of 51 or More Schools

2. Review the Golden Radish Award Criteria Explanations. Interested in learning more about how other LEAs met the criteria in prior years? Click here to view best practices from the 2018 Golden Radish Awardees.

3. Collect relevant district-wide information and documentation for award criteria. Be sure to provide information on how your district works with sustainable and/or Certified Organic farms, innovative ways you partner with your community or utilize your school gardens, and any extraordinary farmers you work with to be eligible for an additional Best Practice Award. Note: Honorary Radishes are awarded to programs that satisfy at least 1 criterion within the Bronze level or higher. Districts are only be eligible to receive an Honorary award for two years.

4.  Apply online here. For planning purposes, you may download a word document version of the 2019 Application.

5. Questions? Review these Frequently Asked Questions or contact Farm to School Director Kimberly Della Donna at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for more information.

The post Burgess Peterson’s Orchard and Garden Celebrates Ten Years appeared first on Georgia Organics.


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