Organic Farming Good Food For All

Organic Farming Good Food For All
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Organic Farming Good Food For All
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Organic Farming Good Food For All
Organic farming

Organic farming is another agricultural system that originated early in the 20th century in response to quickly changing farming techniques. Organic farming has been developed by several organic farming associations now. It depends on fertilizers of natural source like compost manure, green manure, and bone meal and puts emphasis on techniques like crop rotation and companion planting. Biological pest management, mixed cropping as well as the boosting of insect predators are all encouraged. Generally, organic standards are made to permit the utilization of naturally occurring compounds while banning or limiting synthetic materials. For example, naturally occurring pesticides like pyrethrin and rotenone are allowed, while artificial pesticides and fertilizers are usually prohibited. Synthetic substances which are permitted include, as an instance, aluminum sulfate, elemental sulfur and Ivermectin. Reasons for advocation of organic farming include benefits in sustainability, openness, self-sufficiency, autonomy/independence, wellness, food safety, and food security.

Reduced Exposure to Pesticides, Chemicals.
The Organic Trade Association notes if each farmer from the U.S. converted to organic production, we can remove 500 million pounds of harmful and persistent pesticides from going into the environment yearly. Pesticide and chemical usage contributes to several negative environmental dilemmas: 1.Pesticides permit disease immunity to accumulate in crops, weeds, plant-eating-insects, parasites, and bacteria. 2.Compounds and chemicals sprayed plants contaminate the soil, water source, and atmosphere. Occasionally these dangerous pesticides stay about for decades (possibly longer). 3.Artificial compounds also dissuade smart farming techniques like cover crops and crop rotation, which in turn, can cause other dangerous environmental issues like erosion.
Organic Farming Builds Healthy Soil.
To develop wholesome food, you have to begin with healthy soil. Should you treat the dirt with dangerous pesticides and chemicals, you might wind up with dirt which can't flourish by itself. Natural farming practices are much superior than compound soil administration. A sizable nine-year research by USDA Agricultural Research Service (ARS), reveals that natural farming builds up organic soil issue better than traditional no-till farming. Based on Dr. Elaine Ingham, only 1 teaspoon of compost-rich organic dirt could host as many as 600 million to 1 billion beneficial germs from 15,000 species. Ingham notes on the reverse side, 1 teaspoon of soil treated with compounds may carry as much as 100 beneficial bacteria.
Combatting Erosion
Does organic farming build wholesome soil, but it also helps fight severe land and soil problems, like erosion. A significant research comparing adjacent natural and chemically treated wheat fields revealed that the organic area featured eight inches of topsoil compared to treated area and had only twenty the erosion reduction. In case you are not worried about erosion: you ought to be. Erosion problems are really severe, affecting the property, food distribution, and people. But, organic farming techniques do help discourage erosion from happening.
Assessing the Effects of Global Warming
Rodale Institute Farming Systems Trial is America's longest running, side-by-side contrast of traditional and organic farming. The trial, running since 1981, has demonstrated a wholesome organic agriculture system may actually reduce carbon dioxide and also help slow climate change. Actually, the Rodale study shows that: "If just 10,000 moderate sized farms in the U.S. converted into organic production, they'd save as much carbon from the soil it would be equal to carrying 1,174,400 automobiles off the street, or reducing automobile miles driven by 14.62 billion miles.
Organic Farming Supports Water Conservation and Water Health
Dwindling water supplies and inadequate water wellbeing are extremely real threats. When our water source is in danger, individuals and the world wind up suffering. American Rivers notes a significant water pollution threat to U.S ponds is runoff from non-organic farms, for example damaging pesticides, toxic fertilizers, and animal waste. Organic farming helps to keep our water supplies fresh by quitting that contaminated runoff. Organic farming also will help conserve water. Organic farmers, generally speaking, often devote some time amending soil properly and using mulch - both of which help preserve water. Cotton, an in-demand harvest, requires a great deal of irrigation and surplus water once grown conventionally. But, organic cotton farming requires less irrigation and so conserves water.
Discouraging Algal Blooms
Algal blooms (HABs) lead to adverse consequences on the health of individuals and marine creatures and organisms. Algal blooms also negatively impact tourism, diversion and so, regional and local markets. While there's more than 1 reason for algal blooms, a main human-based source of algae blooms is runoff in the petroleum-based fertilizers frequently utilized in traditional farming.
Supporting Animal Health and Welfare
Insects, fish, birds and all kinds of other creatures experience difficulties when individuals swoop in and destroy their habitat. Organic farming helps conserve more natural habitat regions but also promotes birds and other all-natural predators to live happily on farmland, which helps in pest control. Also, animals who reside on organic farms are vulnerable to wash, chemical-free grazing which can help keep them obviously healthy and immune to disease. As a benefit for organic farmers, healthy and happy natural animals are productive organic animals.​
Organic Farming Encourages Biodiversity
Insects, fish, birds and all kinds of other creatures experience difficulties when individuals swoop in and destroy their habitat. Organic farming helps conserve more natural habitat regions but also promotes birds and other all-natural predators to live happily on farmland, which helps in pest control. Also, animals who reside on organic farms are vulnerable to wash, chemical-free grazing which can help keep them obviously healthy and immune to disease. As a benefit for organic farmers, healthy and happy natural animals are productive organic animals.​

Tackling Rural Stress Head-On

It was not a lighthearted greeting. As an occupation, farmers rank third in the nation for suicide rates. Suicide rates in rural America are 55 percent higher than they are in urban areas. Rural Americans are twice as likely to die from opioids as a car accident. A major contributing factor to these trends: “Access […]

The post Tackling Rural Stress Head-On appeared first on Georgia Organics.


It was not a lighthearted greeting. As an occupation, farmers rank third in the nation for suicide rates. Suicide rates in rural America are 55 percent higher than they are in urban areas. Rural Americans are twice as likely to die from opioids as a car accident. A major contributing factor to these trends: “Access […]

The post Tackling Rural Stress Head-On appeared first on Georgia Organics.

It was not a lighthearted greeting.

  • As an occupation, farmers rank third in the nation for suicide rates.
  • Suicide rates in rural America are 55 percent higher than they are in urban areas.
  • Rural Americans are twice as likely to die from opioids as a car accident.
  • A major contributing factor to these trends: “Access to healthcare is a growing challenge and the disturbing trend of hospital closures in rural areas continues.”

These were the somber opening statements to kick of what is probably the first national conference on rural stress, by UGAs Dean of the College of Agriculture and Environmental Sciences, Sam Pardue.

The summit, held over two grey and rainy December days at non-descript hotel near the Atlanta airport, was given the hopeful title, “Rural Stress: Promising Practices and Future Directions.”

About 150 academic researchers, farmer advocates, mental health practitioners, extension agents, and government officials from more than 20 states were on-hand to learn more about the declining state of rural mental health and opioid misuse.

Georgia’s Commissioner of Agriculture Gary Black also addressed the immense devastation caused by Hurricane Michael, which caused more than $3 billion in economic damage to Georgia’s agriculture community when it hit South Georgia with category three hurricane winds on Oct. 10 of this year.

“The challenges are severe,” he said. “We still have a long way to go.”

Additional speakers were able to demonstrate that other regions of the country have been more proactive in addressing rural mental health challenges, especially Minnesota and Kansas, states that are much more rural than even Georgia and other southern states.

In Kansas, telemedicine is seen as a tool to connect with and serve rural farmers suffering from mental stress, opioid misuse, and other physical and mental ailments. Minnesota has an organization, Minnesota Rural Mental Health, which has deep community roots and progressive partnerships with Sherriff’s departments, the department of agriculture, clergy, and others to better assist those in need of acute or long-term mental health needs.

And, in an afternoon panel, Georgia Dept. of Behavioral Health’s Jennifer Dunn spoke to her department’s response to the trauma caused by Hurricane Michael, where she was able to connect southwest Georgia farmers with mental health resources, when needed.

Speakers who’ve experienced natural disasters similar in scale to Hurricane Michael were able to caution all in attendance that suicide rates catapulted after such disasters – tornadoes, floods, and other hurricanes – struck their communities.

To be honest, the solutions that were discussed did not seem up for the task of adequately addressing the mental and financial distress that rural communities face in normal times, much less with the recovery from Hurricane Michael looming.

But two things were exceedingly clear and most welcomed by those in attendance.

  1. It’s truly a good thing to finally convene and discuss these challenges and potential solutions. The people on the front lines helping rural Americans in distress can be just as stressed about their important jobs as the people they are trying to assist.
  2. It’s possible that the most dangerous factor in dealing with rural stress and the nation’s opioid problem isn’t the stress or the opioids themselves. Rather, the more dangerous element is actually the stigma around mental health and those who seek assistance with their mental health. It’s that stigma which prevents those in need from seeking the help that they need.

That stigma just might be the most important problem we need to address.

Coping strategies, proactive planning, and more on mental health and wellness can be found here.

The post Tackling Rural Stress Head-On appeared first on Georgia Organics.


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